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Thread: how much does your cavi weigh??

  1. #11
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    Sparky Weighs 8.3kgs & is 2.5 years old & Lucy weighs 4.5kgs & is aprox 7 months old
    Sonia
    Cass (F - JRT - 25/11/97) Sparky (M - Blen - 11/01/08.) & Lucy (F - Blen - 12/11/09-ish!)
    Leo waiting at the bridge

  2. #12
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    Mine range from 5.5 kg (12 lbs) up to 12.3 kg (27 lbs). Riley is almost 8 years old and very petite. Oliver is my big boy - long legs, long body but not overweight at all. Maddie and Oz are both around 6.8 kg (15 lbs). So there's a lot of range in cavalier sizes.
    Bev
    Oliver (blenheim, born 3/2001), Riley (black & tan, born 8/2002,), Madison (ruby, born 9/2003), and Oz (tri-color, born 7/2007)

  3. #13
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    Our Abigail at almost 2 years weighs in at 15 1/2 lbs. We are trying to get her down to 14 3/4 as she is small in size and her waist is a bit hidden

    Heather R

  4. #14
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    Scarlett is a year and weighs 14lbs.Last time I measured her - a week before her 1st birthday - she was 13 inches high.

  5. #15
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    thank you everyone for your replies. it would seem all cavi's vary. however i think bentley may need to go on a diet as i cant really see a waist (no matter how much i try to convince myself!!! ) and i think, though he doesnt look huge, a few inches lost wouldnt do him any harm. he seems to like carrot sticks so ive swapped him to those as a treat as apposed to the dog tibits. though i think i may have found where these extra few inches may have started from. i caught hin the other night wih him head in his food bin which he had managed to open, the little monkey that he is. i wonder how many times he has done that!!!!

  6. #16
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    Poppy is 5.8kg and 18 mths old.. was told by groomer that she looked underweight :-S

  7. #17
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    I know this is a common concern, but still I hate these questions as it implies cavaliers should be a certain weight. As others note, there's a very large variation even within the breed standard of 12-18 lbs. The tendency in the show ring has been for many cavaliers to either hit or exceed the upper limit for a while now, especially males. Most healthy males are larger than breed standard, amongst UK show dogs and US show dogs, going by breeder discussions, and some have raised whether the breed standard should be changed, especially as most breeders feel cavaliers at the bottom weight are not great breed examples, too small framed without enough bone or good build -- unlike say chihuahuas or papillons this isn't a dainty breed as the breed standard makes pretty clear. I've seen concern that some are breeding such small slight dogs that B&Ts look more like short-faced longhaired dachshunds. You'd really see very few showring cavaliers under about 16lbs, male or female.

    Many researchers currently believe it is better for the breed to be larger rather than smaller, and that something in a dog being smaller probably means a greater inclination towards SM because the condition only occurs in miniaturised breeds. Some trigger is thus set off genetically, most likely, by breeding a downsized dog.

    Unfortunately there are scores of breeders who aim for extra small undersized dogs as if this is a selling point (and even charge extra for their unhealthy approach to breeding) -- it never should be as some natural cases aside, smaller dogs tend to be extra small for health reasons or breeding choices that a good health-focused breeder would not make. A breeder well-informed on SM and research findings will be unlikely to have small size as a positive. At the same time there's no direct correlation in individual dogs, and both larger and smaller cavaliers have SM -- and most cavaliers will probably eventually have SM as even the main vet for the UK Kennel Club, himself a geneticist, now seems to recognise (asked about incidence in cavaliers, he noted at a recent breeder seminar that reports he is getting indicate now that in cavaliers 60% or more will end up with SM). But researchers generally have noted that smallness brings consequences in bone development -- every choice brings unintended conequences many poorly understood -- and seems potentially linked to selecting for increased risk of SM -- as does a very short muzzle.

    A vet can help determine if an individual dog is within a healthy weight -- what other people's cavaliers weigh is pretty irelevent. As noted, an individual dog should have a clear waist and its ribs should be easily felt but covered with a smooth layer of skin and some fat (eg not bony). Breeder Laura Lang's page on correct body shape and what to feed is very good on this issue.

    In rescue over the past many years I've had cavaliers as small as Penny above , and as large as 40+pounds, all in good weight for their build. Penny actually was pretty underweight when she came in and is still filling out and of course is still young.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  8. #18
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    My cavalier is 5.6kg and he's just over 8 months. I'm not sure how much my mums cavvie weighs, she's 3 weeks older than mine but she's huge in comparison.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karlin View Post
    Many researchers currently believe it is better for the breed to be larger rather than smaller, and that something in a dog being smaller probably means a greater inclination towards SM because the condition only occurs in miniaturised breeds. Some trigger is thus set off genetically, most likely, by breeding a downsized dog.

    Unfortunately there are scores of breeders who aim for extra small undersized dogs as if this is a selling point (and even charge extra for their unhealthy approach to breeding) -- it never should be as some natural cases aside, smaller dogs tend to be extra small for health reasons or breeding choices that a good health-focused breeder would not make.
    Like Karlin I have very strong feelings about this issue as many know.

    Deliberately breeding to downsize ie pocket, teacup etc should be outlawed, often so called breeders will use 2 very small for breed examples to attempt to breed miniature, pocket or teacup size.

    Obviously this is because they are in demand and command a great deal more cash for the exceptionally small examples; all because of the *ignorance* of the general public on how genetics/dog breeding works and some strange notion that the smallest or biggest is best - it ain't!!

    The problem is that many already "undersized" dogs are just that way because of genetic faults/defects, to then put 2 such examples together as sire and dam is asking for trouble. The breeder can end up with pups then sold to an unwitting general public whose lives are abnormally shortened because of hereditary defects or who live pain filled lives. Don't put your money in the pockets of these charlatans!

    A truly committed breeder breeds for health, "type" and with an overall aim to improve the breed above all else; and certainly never for financial considerations.
    Briar, Jack, Berry and coeliac cocker Bracken foster cockers Rowan and puppy Simba

    "Spaniels In Need"
    (a 'not for profit' rescue organisation)

  10. #20
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    Cavaliers definitely do vary in size! Our male Cav Max is a healthy 17 pounds for his frame, and he is 15 months old.

    My female Lexie however is 14 months old and varies between 6 and 1/2 and 7 pounds (yes that is POUNDS, not KILOS)

    She's completely healthy our vet says, just small. We had a lot of issues with the breeder. She didn't worm Lexie and when we got her from what we though was a reputable researched breeder, Lexie's stomach was so swollen she couldn't use her back legs (we thought she couldn't walk). The Vet guesses that the stress of her puppyhood along with being a runt contributed to her small size. Thankfully she is perfect now!

    We did report the breeder and had the option to return Lexie to get a "healthier breed standard puppy" but obviously that was never an option. It actually worked out well because she is about the size of my sisters papillon and they are best friends (not that I would ever encourage breeding of small cavaliers for any purpose)

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