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Thread: whether to adopt another cavy?

  1. #1
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    Default whether to adopt another cavy?

    Hi i will apologise in advance if i have posted this on the wrong board but i was unsure were to post.
    I have a 7 year old female cavalier and over the last year or so have been thinking of buying a new pup or adopting a rescue cavy.
    To cut a long story short i have been offered another female cavy who needs a new home due to being let down by previous owners i believe she has had 3 homes already.
    90% of me wants to as i know i could give her a lovely home however my concern is my other cavy and how she would take to another dog as she as always been on her own.
    The dog to adopt is 5 years so its not like introducing a pup, but still i am concerned as to how she would take to a new family member.
    So i was wondering if anyone has any experience with introducing another dog.
    As i know the cavy has had a few homes already i would really hate to bring her into my home and it not work out i would just feel so guilty.
    I know no one can 100% guarantee it would work out but was wondering what other people have found in this situation.
    Thanks sally

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    Lucky was young when I brought Sparky into the picture (2 years old), so I cannot really say how and older dog will do with a new older sibling, but I can say that Cavaliers tend to be very social animals and they love having a companion.

    Lucky really likes having Sparky around. My relationship with Lucky did change a bit as he was no longer and "only dog", but when I would come home from work and see them cuddled up sleeping together I knew I had made the right choice.

    I also know people who do fostering and have older dogs (but multiple dogs). They do fine incorporating in fosters of all ages.

    So I guess I really am no help, but could you possibly bring the 5 year old into your home for a few days on a trial basis to see if it works out? Chances are it will, but if it doesn't then you will not feel so much that you are letting the dog down if it doesn't since it'd be a trial.
    Lani
    (a.k.a. Lucky's & Sparky's mom!)

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    Many rescues will allow a short trial period. I realize that you don't want to become the 4th home that didn't work out for this dog, but you might be the right home. Give it a shot.

    Introduce the dogs outside of the home (at a park, or something). Then leash them up (you could try both, or have someone else walk the other dog) and walk them into the house as if everything is perfectly normal.

    Some potential problem areas are going to food, toys, and people. I tried to bring in a rescue back in April, but he was very aggressive toward Guinness about toys, so we had to give him back.

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    A 4th potential home that ends up not working out is better than not trying and never knowing if your home was "the one". I would feel guilty too if it didn't work out, but if it doesn't, at least you genuinely tried. At this point the dog has already gone to so many places she probably is used to adjusting pretty quickly, if anything.

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    I would talk to his present owners and express your concerns, maybe try a visit prehaps in your garden for a while and let them in house with the new dog leased for an hour one day, if that goes well maybe have the new dog all day and go out for lots of walks, then try a weekend and do it gradually but i really would give it a go that way their will be no regrets, im sure it will go much better it your take your time and make sure your present dogs dont lose out.
    What's the difference between a new husband and a new dog? After a year, the dog is still excited to see you.

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    I foster dogs and have varying success in introducing them to my lot although the main issue seems to be size difference which isn't a problem in your case [a few small dogs coming in have freaked at my german shepherds!]. You know your own dog - how does she react with other dogs she meets out & about; do friends/family visit with their dogs - is she jealous then? I know my dogs are OK about a newbie coming in and trust them, so any problems that come from the foster settling in will be just the new dog. There will be a settling in period [although I find that a newbie will be on best behaviour for a week or so, it's after that issues may arise]. It's best to lift toys away for a while until the dogs are comfortable together and always supervise feeding.
    I agree with the others, Cavs are usually sociable and enjoy company of their own kind. I also understand the feeling of guilt in case it doesn't work out but [again as others have said] it's better to have tried. I fall for most of my fosters and feel guilty I can't keep them but if I did there wouldn't be room for the next one. I'd probably feel guiltier if I hadn't tried or done anything in the first place. Good luck in making your decision.

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    It's great that you want to help this wee one and are obviously thinking very hard about it first rather than just jumping straight in.


    We have often introduced older dogs to an existing pack and rarely have had problems - only with two former stud dogs.

    However generally if bitches fall out, that is far worse than dogs, as dogs tend to be able to settle it.


    Have a read of this

    http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/s...206#post317206


    there are some very sensible suggestions above - I agree with those, especially valued resources such as toys, food, treats, beds and obviously most importantly of all, you!! I would not leave them unattended together for at least a few weeks just in case.

    I would make sure there is more than one water bowl available, separate them well at meal times [even crate separately to be entirely safe] although if you have one that won't eat, the competition is very helpful!!

    Ideally first few walks with two of you holding them on separate leads and if all is going well, let them play together somewhere secure.

    You will need to do a lot of work and training with the new one - do you know why she has had so many homes? Does she have some issues you need to be prepared to work through? [Possibly separation anxiety with that history]


    Love is wonderful but sadly does not overcome every problem - you are going to need to spend considerable time training, and working with the new dog - can you do that without upsetting your existing dog?


    A few things to think about - keep us posted and the very best of luck generally Cavaliers LOVE having a companion after that initial teething period, and there's nothing more wonderful than seeing them cuddled up together.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

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    I would start by asking the current home why they are rehoming this dog, and what were the other reasons given by past families. If there is a serious behaviour or health issue, you need to know that up front. If the dog is being homed via a rescue, they should be able to provide that information. If it is an owner rehome, I would really want them to be honest and if there are issues, they should talk to breed rescue in the UK for help in rehoming to a vetted home that can manage whatever the problems have been, if any. To me, it seems strange that a dog would be bounced around to lots of homes without there being a reason.

    That said, 95% of dogs fit into a new home, and 95% of dogs in the home will eventually accept and enjoy a new addition though it can mean giving some time for this to happen. Most 'problems' that end up with a dog being returned are in my experience, not real problems at all with the dogs, but owners giving up on dogs that would welcome a newcomer if given appropriate time. People too often expect an immediate fit and dogs thrilled to have a new friend when in reality just as with people, it takes time to adjust to a new roommate!!

    I would def talk in depth to the home and as Nicki suggests, bring your own dog over to meet the cavalier. And I would consider whether you feel this is the right dog for you if you have a lot of misgivings. It would not I think be fair on the dog to go into this with a lot of concern and trepidation where the dog might quickly be bounced back. This is no criticism of you, just that you need to be very honest with what YOU feel you can manage. I doubt the dogs will have any issues, but not everyone wants to or is able to deal with a challenging dog that has been rehomed lots of times. You want to be sure that either this is OK with you; or that the reasons for rehoming are trivial. If she isn;t the right dog for you I'd encourage them to contact breed rescue.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

  9. #9
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    Thank you everyone for the great advice you offered it was very much appreciated.

    Anyway i just thought i would like to give you all an update with the situation.
    I went to visit the cavy and she was beautiful she was very very timid but this was due to her being hit by her previous owners.The chap that rescued her said the owners that hit her didnt want her so he took her but he didnt think he would have the time to look after.
    Before she was with the people who hit her, she had lived with a family but due to change in circumstances they couldnt keep her.
    So there wasnt any behavioral problems infact she was extremely well trained however at what cost to her i dont know.
    Anyway to cut a long story short i would of been very willing to rehome her however the chap that rescued her has decided to keep her.
    I was alittle disapointed as i think she would of been perfect but meeting the chap and seeing her with him i know she will be adored and his concern was that he worked and he felt she needed someone to be at home with her.
    And he explained his mother would be helping him with her.
    After this happening it has confirmed in me that i do want to adopt another cavy so i have contacted my local cavalier rescue and i am on the waiting list for when a suitable cavy comes in.
    I am just glad that the cavy has been taken out that enviroment and be given the love she needs and deserves.
    Thanks again everyone for all your help
    sally

  10. #10
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    I would start by asking the current home why they are rehoming this dog, and what were the other reasons given by past families. If there is a serious behaviour or health issue, you need to know that up front. If the dog is being homed via a rescue, they should be able to provide that information. If it is an owner rehome, I would really want them to be honest and if there are issues, they should talk to breed rescue in the UK for help in rehoming to a vetted home that can manage whatever the problems have been, if any. To me, it seems strange that a dog would be bounced around to lots of homes without there being a reason.

    My thoughts exactly!

    I am sorry that this did not work out, but I am sure there are hundreds of other cavaliers looking for a forever home!
    Mommy to....

    Chamberlain (10 month Male Blenheim Cavalier)
    Sasha (6 year old Female Great Pyrennes)

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