Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Very severe colitis - rapid onset

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Very severe colitis - rapid onset

    Misha went from soft stool to diarrhea/panting/pacing to bloody water squirts in 3 hours. At the end of those 3 hours, he became completely limp and all you could see was his stomach heaving around inside.

    The vets found nothing remarkable so he was sent home after fluids with metronidazole and panacur. After 3 hours at the vets, he seemed more like his usual self. His been extremely lethargic today, but gradually getting better. No stool since the vet trip.

    Has anyone experienced anything like this

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NY, NY
    Posts
    267
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Jack had a similar episode last week. He hasn't had problems with loose stool since he was a puppy. I freaked out,when he like Misha started having blood coming out. I took him to the vet got metronidazole along with a probiotic and he was already on the mend by the next day. The stool sample was negative for parasite or bacteria. I read some where that metronidazole sometimes makes dogs slightly constipated so I wouldn't worry if he doesn't go as much as usual. Most important thing my vet said was that dogs with diarrhea stay hydrated.
    Irene-
    Jack and Penny's Mom, NYC

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Carolina USA
    Posts
    921
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Gracie had an array of colitis bouts

    None developed quit this fast. An array of things eaten that shouldn't be can cause this fast reaction. The main thing is for continued improvement and hydration. My vet had to give Gracie fluids a couple of times. Get as much water in as you can You did not mention bland diet for a while. Most vets would suggest that for at least a day or 2....working back slowly to regular food. If diarrhea does not go away, go back to vet soon. Do not expect bowel movement for a while as the system is empty.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    23,999
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Yes, this is haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. It can be fatal, and act very quickly so you were wise to rush to the vets. If there's any turn for the worse get back right away.

    To me it seems the breed is prone to this -- it comes up regularly on the board and my friends with other breeds and mixes seem never to have problems with it. Most of mine have had this at some point, to some degree -- my Lily most of the time, who gets occasional bouts but never seems to be much the worse for wear. Basically you need to know your dog -- I know Lily will be OK if food is withheld and she gets something like Prokolin and that prevents it turning into really bloody diarrhea. For other dogs a rapid onset bout could be fatal so it is *never* something to wait and see about before contacting a vet. Fortunately it often looks worse than it is. Keeping the dog hydrated is most important as most dogs that eventually succumb do so because of severe dehydration.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NY, NY
    Posts
    267
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes Karlin, that was the exact diagnosis my vet wrote down that Jack had it last week. It is very scary when you see red blood dripping from their butt. The vet said it is just the colon's reaction to extreme irritation. Thankfully it often resolves quickly with proper treatment.
    These poor dogs they are prone to so many health issues, but I love them and they are totally worth it IMHO
    Irene-
    Jack and Penny's Mom, NYC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Posts
    1,842
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Karlin wrote: it seems the breed is prone to this

    This could have something to do with most Cavaliers being very greedy! You can stop them eating food off the pavement when they are on lead, but it's virtually impossible to stop them scavenging when off-lead and people drop food EVERYWHERE (our bus stop in town used to be outside McDonald's and was surrounded by chicken bones!). My first Cavalier, who died of HGE, seems to have eaten infected human faeces left under a tree in the park by a tramp sleeping rough - not something you expect to have to watch out for!

    My only Cavalier who has had colitis had a mild bout from eating the cooked pig's ears treats sold in pet shops - too rich and too rough for his tummy.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    23,999
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Kate I am sure this is definitely one major factor -- some are total hoovers on walks and will eat absolutely anything. I am sorry to hear of the sad consequences for one of your dogs.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Forgot to mention that I had given him a pectalin tab (very similar to prokolin) at onset of diarrhea and it did not help at all.

    He has many other minor problems because he is just shy of his 15th birthday. We thought it was the end when he had gone limp :'( and sobbed the whole way to the vets. He is on a kidney diet, so we switched to egg whites and sticky rice for a couple days. Yesterday, he was rather down and I hand fed him small amounts of food in the morning and afternoon. Around 9/9:30 he really perked back up to his usual self.

    He did not vomit which was good at least - less fluid loss. I'm relieved he isn't the only dog that has gone through this. It was the scariest thing I've ever seen happen to him.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Posts
    182
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    glad he is feeling better. rubys had this twice ,the first time she was only seven months old, i thought wei would lose her . the second time was worse, the place looked like a murder scene . i phoned the emergency vet who was on site and he said if she loses any more bring her to be put on a drip. this was midnight. but then she fell into a deep sleep and i could tell she was sleeping peacefully so i risked taking her to bed . she woke up in the morning and i could see she was over the worst so i got teaspoons of water into her all day and she perked up. i think that time was because she had some treats , they were the wagg ones very red in colour and i think she had a reaction. very scary thing indeed . i am now very strict on what she has as treats (in fact she gets her normal burns food as treats lol . better safe than sorry .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    North Scotland - east coast
    Posts
    9,949
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    So sorry about your first Cavalier Kate

    My friends' lost their beautiful Cavalier, Honey, when they were on holiday and she was in kennels - the staff went in in the morning to find her in a pool of vomit, diarrhoea and blood.

    This is another true veterinary emergency, most especially in puppies and oldies - it can literally be fatal in hours, so never hesitate if there is blood pouring from both ends.


    Thank goodness Misha is ok - you were very wise to go straight to the vets
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •