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Thread: Ben was attacked yesterday

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by team bella View Post
    Hi James

    However I am considering purchasing a small riding whip, and keeping it up my sleeve or coat, to protect my girls as anything like that is distressing to all.
    Let us know how he gets on
    I'm loving that idea - I'm thinking about pepper spray myself. I get so upset when an irresponsible owner has a dog off a leash and it injures someone. No excuse for that.

    I'm sorry this happened to your dog, but so glad that it wasn't worse.
    ________________________________________________
    Mom to tri puppy Chloe Louise ...and a cat, and a rabbit

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ByFloSin View Post

    I carry a slim handbag sized aerosol of hairspray in my pocket when I am out with the dogs. Any nasty ones getting too up close and personal will get it full in the face and eyes. Rough justice yes, but if the owner cannot or will not control their dog then it is for me to protect mine.

    Please be extremely careful, especially with PBTs. The police used pepper spray on the dog attacking the pup, 3 times, spraying him full in the face. This only incited him more. I was told that if thye are fighters pain just increases their viciousness. The police really did not want to shot for fear of hitting the pup, but even if that happened at that point it would have been more humane then having him ripped apart by the other dog. The dog did bite Dave,, who was holding the pup,leaving a gash in his arm, also. Poor Dave, he didn't get to go to the hospital until after the pup was treated.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by lscott View Post
    Please be extremely careful, especially with PBTs. The police used pepper spray on the dog attacking the pup, 3 times, spraying him full in the face. This only incited him more. I was told that if thye are fighters pain just increases their viciousness. The police really did not want to shot for fear of hitting the pup, but even if that happened at that point it would have been more humane then having him ripped apart by the other dog. The dog did bite Dave,, who was holding the pup,leaving a gash in his arm, also. Poor Dave, he didn't get to go to the hospital until after the pup was treated.
    But surely the hairspray would temporarily blind the dog, so that he would not be able to see what he was doing, giving me or the person on the receiving end with a chance to get the hell out of there?
    Warmest wishes
    Flo & the ByFloSin Cavaliers
    Rebel, Winston Alexander,Little Joe & Holly Poppet
    Birmingham, UK

  4. #54
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    I have been thinking alot abut this over the last few days and it is worrying to think that even by holding your dog they could still be in trouble.

    There are alot of 'pit type' breeds around where I am. I hear people bragging about their dogs all the time.

    I have to be mega careful when I am out as I have 2 dogs to look after and I am on my own with them all the time, what would I do if something came on the attack- I couldn't pick both dogs up- thats over 18kg of weight and needless to say awkward! I often think I would dive on top of them both to sheild them but truth be told... who knows what I woud do In the thinck of it,

    There is a certain stillness that a dog projects before it attacks. Perfect stillness! The ears are normally flat and the tail straight out with a slow wag at the tip back and forth. If they are on the lead they will be infront of an owner- straining with a pause and go motion of movement or a complete stillness. Owners that allow their dogs to stand and stare are making the problem worse as they are giving the dog time to get worked up. They should be turning the dog around and moving away- but if they dont then you need to get away!

    If you ever watch nature programs and watch what Wolves/Hyenas/Coyotes do before they pouce, its the same thing.

    I always canvas an area before I walk on to it (parks and so forth) if there is a loose dog on there that I don't know I walk another direction to go somewhere else.

    If I have Ruby off lead and a dog comes on to the park that I dont know- I put her on and walk the other direction.

    Dogs that turn their heads or bodys as they approach are generally a bit weary, sniffing the ground, avoiding eye contact and tail hug low- they are telling your dog that they mean no harm and don't want a confrontation.

    Then there is the happy, overlly playful dog that is straining on the lead to get to your dog, tougue hanging out and nose on the go- they may be a bit much for a small cavalier to contend with in a play situation,

    Please take the time to watch dogs when you are out and about- it is so very interesting and is the best lesson you ca ever have on reading a dogs way of talking!

    Karen

    Ruby - my stunning soul mate who defies the odds every day
    Charlie- my angel at heart and devil at play


  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen and Ruby View Post
    I have been thinking alot abut this over the last few days and it is worrying to think that even by holding your dog they could still be in trouble.

    There are alot of 'pit type' breeds around where I am. I hear people bragging about their dogs all the time.

    I have to be mega careful when I am out as I have 2 dogs to look after and I am on my own with them all the time, what would I do if something came on the attack- I couldn't pick both dogs up- thats over 18kg of weight and needless to say awkward! I often think I would dive on top of them both to sheild them but truth be told... who knows what I woud do In the thinck of it,

    There is a certain stillness that a dog projects before it attacks. Perfect stillness! The ears are normally flat and the tail straight out with a slow wag at the tip back and forth. If they are on the lead they will be infront of an owner- straining with a pause and go motion of movement or a complete stillness. Owners that allow their dogs to stand and stare are making the problem worse as they are giving the dog time to get worked up. They should be turning the dog around and moving away- but if they dont then you need to get away!

    If you ever watch nature programs and watch what Wolves/Hyenas/Coyotes do before they pouce, its the same thing.

    I always canvas an area before I walk on to it (parks and so forth) if there is a loose dog on there that I don't know I walk another direction to go somewhere else.

    If I have Ruby off lead and a dog comes on to the park that I dont know- I put her on and walk the other direction.

    Dogs that turn their heads or bodys as they approach are generally a bit weary, sniffing the ground, avoiding eye contact and tail hug low- they are telling your dog that they mean no harm and don't want a confrontation.

    Then there is the happy, overlly playful dog that is straining on the lead to get to your dog, tougue hanging out and nose on the go- they may be a bit much for a small cavalier to contend with in a play situation,

    Please take the time to watch dogs when you are out and about- it is so very interesting and is the best lesson you ca ever have on reading a dogs way of talking!
    I have to agree with you, I've been thinking about this a lot too. There are often dogs straying while we are out, some have actually become 'friends' with my two, but then there are those, especially the ones who watch us through their fence and look quiet and still, focused. There is one in particular that we don't walk past the house anymore because the dog looked very menacing, and she's completely quiet and still with that stance. I'm afraid she'll jump her fence someday. Then there's the big labs across the road that bounce against their gate and bark to high heaven. It's a dangerous thing, having a dog, what a pity.
    I don't like the idea of a whip or stick, but maybe the stick could put a barrier between the attacker and your own dog. I don't know. Being vigilant and aware at all times is best, but still there are no guarantees.
    Desrae, guardian of two tri-coloured cavaliers, Belle 3 years old and Bobby 1 year/8 months.

  6. #56
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    Okay, I will say it. If it's me, and I fear an attack, I will do WHATEVER I have to do to protect Claire. That may mean damaging the other dog, and I will take my chances with the end results.

    I am a HUGE animal lover, but the safety of people and small animals comes first. Sometimes dogs that attack are beyond saving due to damage done early in their life. And a dog that would attack a small dog would generally attack a toddler or small child.

    And yes, small dogs can attack too. A family member had a dog that bit too many people to count. This dog had been through hundreds of dollars of training and behavior modification. His background was unknown as he ended up in a shelter early on, at maybe 2-3 years old. Even rescue didn't want him. He was a mess. When he became agitated it was like he was in another world.

    It's just hard to know what to do, and it's a shame that we have to think about this. When I walk down the street with Claire, I put myself between her and anyone walking toward us. I hope never to have to face this issue.

    Hope that Ben is improving every day, poor sweet dear!
    Cindy and Claire
    Claire was born on Feb7, 2010

  7. #57
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    I'm going to get the 30ml corrector spray and keep it in my coat pocket as a precaution. I think avoiding likely situations is the most important thing, then reading dog behaviour and if then an awful attack does ever occur, will try the corrector spray and some karate kicks if necessary!

  8. #58
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    And yes, small dogs can attack too.
    Yes people forget that - generally not Cavaliers though! I've known of a Jack Russell run through the legs of a very gentle GSD, and bite him badly underneath

    Quote Originally Posted by mommytoClaire View Post
    And a dog that would attack a small dog would generally attack a toddler or small child.
    I'm sorry I don't agree with this, dog aggression is very different from people aggression.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  9. #59
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    Thank you all again for your kind words and comments. Ben has improved noticeably yesterday (Saturday) and today, considering that on Friday when I lifted him very gently and he screamed with pain, yesterday I took him in the car to my friends newly acquired farmhouse where to my surprise he chased one of the cats who obliged and ran, we have discovered that the four cats are tame,are all very dog friendly and do not see Ben as a threat, taking great pleasure in headbutting Ben and rubbing against him much to his alarm.
    He also does not seem to have any fear of familiar large dogs and yesterday he met two collies that were new to him, he wanted to be friends with them as he usually is with strange dogs, it was me that was very wary.
    The wider area swelling has gone down but he still has a 2" broad vertical swelling down his right side, and the single puncture wound on his left is healing well.
    Conversely yesterday morning he had a panic attack when I covered him with the blanket that he normally buries himself under, I suspect that he remembers something coming from above and attacking him and possibly he does not realise that it was a dog and this is why he is not scared of them.
    He is sleeping a lot but when awake has resumed his usual behaviour of accompanying me everywhere as well as constantly searching for food.
    Last edited by James; 17th October 2011 at 10:49 PM. Reason: spelling
    Ben (Blenheim)

    Still missing Toby (Blenheim) and Ciara (Black and Tan)
    www.tobydug.co.uk

  10. #60
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    Good news about Ben recovering slowly but surely. On one hand, it's great he might not have realized it was a dog who attacked him and might be ok around them still.... but on the other hand, he may be frightened of other things that remind him of the attack (like the blanket).
    Desrae, guardian of two tri-coloured cavaliers, Belle 3 years old and Bobby 1 year/8 months.

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