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Thread: Ben was attacked yesterday

  1. #41
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    It is so sad that big dogs get such a bad wrap. I grew up with labs and German Shepards who were so sweet and gentle. In fact most of the dogs that snap at Jack are little toy dogs. The dog that bit him was a dachshund. HOWEVER, as we all know it can only take one bite from a big dog to cause serious possible deadly damage, thus I am always more leary around the larger breeds. It is a sad but true reality. I once had a man with two adult pitbulls lecture me when I pulled Jack away from a meet and greet session on the street. He said something like "not all pitbulls are mean and people like you perpetuate the stereotype". I felt bad because I love all dogs, but should something stir these owner labeled "friendly dogs" , I know one chomp and Jack would be done.

    I appreciate the ideas above. One never knows how they will react in the situation. However, the technique for pulling the hind legs is a good one to store away in the back of my mind. One never knows when this information may be applicable and save a life. In the meantime, I just keep Jack on close lead and keep socialization to the neighborhood dogs I really know well.

    Glad to hear poor Ben is seeming a little better today. I cringe everytime I read about him being shaken by the bigger dog. Give him lots of gentle kisses and hugs from Jack and I.
    Irene-
    Jack and Penny's Mom, NYC

  2. #42
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    My daughter's small Brittney Spaniel pup was attacked by a Pit Bull several years ago, while in her yard. The dog actually followed her boyfriend, who had picked up the pup when he saw the dog, inside the apartment building and tore the puppy from his arms, also biting him in the process. It was a pretty traumatic scene, but thankfully the police were near. Pepper spray had no effect on the Pitt, and sadly he was shot by the police to save the pup from literally being torn apart. The pup was badly bruised and had a puncture wound completely through his hind quarter, but did survive without any permenent physical damage. He remains fearful of unfamiliar anaimals. We later found out that the dog had previously attacked and seriously injured another dog, yet he was again unleashed on the street. Irresponsible owners are responsible for these types of tradegies.

  3. #43
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    Thank you for sharing this story. I've been too trusting and now know to be more protective. Give our best to Ben.

  4. #44
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    So sorry to hear about this Jim, I wrote you a long reply last night and it obviously didn't appear

    How is Ben today?

    It's good that he has started eating again, try softening his Burns with some warm water, if he is sore around the head area he might be finding it hard to eat hard food.


    You can obtain something called Zylkene from your vet, that might help to calm Ben.

    Rescue Remedy is brilliant, you can get it from your chemist. I put 3-4 drops in their water bowl, also put 2 drops in their mouth [be careful with the glass dropper] - can do this as often as every 5 minutes for up to an hour in an emergency situation.

    Also a few drops of Lavender essential oil - again in chemist or health food shop - in the area he is lying is calming.



    The episode has made me assess meeting large dogs and from now on I will be avoiding them and/or picking him up as well as carrying a heavy stick.
    Please don't pick him up as that actually encourages other dogs to attack as it increases their interest, you are also putting yourself in danger too.

    The best thing is stand still facing the oncoming dog, in dog behaviour this acts as a block [why people often have recall problems]


    YOu are both in our thoughts, hoping that Ben will soon be feeling a lot better. Once he is a bit better, try introducing him to dogs he knows that will be gentle and build up from there.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  5. #45
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    You can learn more about flower remedies from this book http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flower-Remed...8533456&sr=1-7
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  6. #46
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    You can have no idea how much it distresses me to read of these awful PBT attacks. They are outlawed in the UK, but imported for breeding and fighting from Ireland. Unless detected at border controls and ports there is no way to stop this happening.

    The fighting people openly boast on web sites about the ferocity of their animals, then mate them with others of similar calibre hoping to perpetuate the ferocity of the fighting strain.

    You have no idea how much it distresses me or how many recollections run through my head every time I read of these attacks. That poor little pup is lucky not to have been more traumatised by the attack.

    I carry a slim handbag sized aerosol of hairspray in my pocket when I am out with the dogs. Any nasty ones getting too up close and personal will get it full in the face and eyes. Rough justice yes, but if the owner cannot or will not control their dog then it is for me to protect mine.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo & the ByFloSin Cavaliers
    Rebel, Winston Alexander,Little Joe & Holly Poppet
    Birmingham, UK

  7. #47
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    Someone told me to carry pepper spray in case me and Bobby are set upon by any vicious dog off the lead. Is this legal and if so, does anyone know how to get it?

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJW View Post
    Someone told me to carry pepper spray in case me and Bobby are set upon by any vicious dog off the lead. Is this legal and if so, does anyone know how to get it?
    If you're in the US, laws/legality vary by state --

    http://www.misdefenseproducts.com/Pe...ions-sp-6.html

  9. #49
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    In the United Kingdom, "Any weapon of whatever description designed or adapted for the discharge of any noxious liquid, gas or other thing" is a Prohibited Weapon, under S.5 of The Firearms Act 1968. The same act covers other prohibited weapons such as automatic firearms and rocket launchers, all of which can only be possessed by permission of the Home Secretary. Although legal for police officers, recent debates have arisen whether such a weapon should be legal for civilians as means of defensive purposes only.


    This is effective for deterring dogs http://www.companyofanimals.co.uk/pr.../pet-corrector

    Snakes, insects and birds such as geese, use their hiss sound to drive off predators and our domesticated pets have an instinctive sensitivity to this sound. The Pet Corrector emits a hiss of air which mimics this sound, to interrupt undesirable behaviours in dog.


    I would not personally use it for jumping up etc but have carried it in the past when we used to walk near the house of some Collies that had previously attacked Rupert [and were often loose ] It made them go away.



    Please don't use hairspray, you could seriously injure their eyes and possibly be charged with assault


    Always keep your height, and shout "NO" in a loud voice, it should halt the dog long enough to get your dog safely behind you. You need to project confidence.


    As Karen says, learn to read body language - dogs that want to play have big, loose body movements. Dogs that may want to fight are much stiffer in their movements.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  10. #50
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    Very good advice thanks. I will take a look at the corrector.

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