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Thread: Monitoring health?

  1. #1
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    Default Monitoring health?

    This has been highlighted by Sabby on another thread, but I thought the Karlton Index http://www.thekarltonindex.com/ may be something that the many breeders that visit this site should be aware of. They are not likely to see this information on any other cavalier website.............


    "This entire project is dedicated to improving the health and welfare of our dogs. The health and welfare of dogs have become contentious issues of late so to help us all understand just what is happening I have established a way of measuring our progress.
    The Karlton INDEX™ will highlight the breeds that are making the most progress, it will illustrate just how they are managing to do this, it will encourage the sharing of knowledge and understanding and champion those that persevere. It will flag up the breeds that lag behind too but with a view to identifying what is holding them back and assist them in overcoming the barriers they face."

    Breed scores are awarded on the basis of published information and data on breed club websites.

    Cavaliers score 13 and the comments on their page read..............

    "The
    Club website has a worthy aim of “providing up-to-date information on health”, but is immediately scuppered by the next sentence, “Cavaliers are generally a happy, healthy breed”. Evidence suggests that in fact Cavaliers have become one of the most afflicted with genetic health problems.

    That being said there is more information on the site than ever before and they do update it with details of the many health-related events that now take place. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel community is a dramatic reminder to all other breeds of how easy it is to breed in serious health conditions and how difficult people can make the reversal of that. They have a history of persistent denial, they have a history of attacking the messenger, and they have not yet created a culture of early adoption of best breeding practice. The current approach to managing health, as presented now, certainly fails to match the urgent need for concerted action that the clinical evidence says is required. Better web-based resources on cavalier health can be found at
    Cavalier Campaign and Cavalier Matters and Cavalier health. The Club is improving its approach, but the pace of change needs to quicken. Afterall over 103,000 were registered in the past ten years"


    Unfortunately the Cavalier Club has now handed all decision making about health matters to the Cavalier Health Liaison Committee. I doubt whether there would have been any score at all if the CHLC website had been the one assessed. Just take a look at their one and only page....... http://www.cavalierhealth.co.uk/

    A few out-of-date notices and an old press release about the Dry Eye Curly Coat and the Episodic Falling Syndrome tests, but no information about the FREE DNA tests for these conditions now being offered? ( Nor did the Cavalier Club send out this information with their recent mail out )

    The AHT have offered these free tests to establish how widespread these conditions are in the Cavalier population. I wonder why the CHLC are not promoting it?

    No news about the new BVA/KC scheme designed to help establish the official EBV project, no information about the KC/AHT EBV project itself, although until recently there was a link to a Mickey Mouse alternative EBV scheme.
    I'm glad to see that link has been removed, although when I last checked our KC health representative and the CHLC Chairman's wife were still promoting this tin pot rival scheme on the Belgium website.

    The CHLC gives no information, no links, no help to any one trying to find out anything about the health of cavaliers. It is a breed disgrace that this is what represents club members.

    Among those that have any interest in improving the health of cavaliers the CHLC has gained a reputation for being a black hole down which all health initiatives disappear forever.
    Despite the often repeated assertion by breeders that it is MVD that is the biggest problem in cavaliers, I do not think that there is any chance of an official heart scheme being progressed by this group.

    There is some interesting discussion about the CHLC and its Chairman on Jemima Harrison's blog......... http://pedigreedogsexposed.blogspot.....html#comments
    Margaret C

    Cavaliers......Faith, The Ginger Tank and Woody.
    Japanese Chins.... Dandy, Benny, Bridgette and Hana.
    Remembered with love......... Tommy Tuppence and Fonzi

  2. #2
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    This is interesting stuff. Who has instigated this though? How official is the Karlton Index? as it doesn't seem to have anything about who/what it is, so for devil's argument, it could be as tin pot as the Belguim scheme?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Davecav View Post
    This is interesting stuff. Who has instigated this though? How official is the Karlton Index? as it doesn't seem to have anything about who/what it is, so for devil's argument, it could be as tin pot as the Belguim scheme?

    PRESS RELEASE 12 noon 09.10.11

    The Karlton Index
    Measuring progress in the health of our dogs

    The first full listing against the framework of The Karlton Index has now been completed and published at www.thekarltonindex.com

    The top scoring breed is Dachshunds. Congratulations to the team behind the Dachshund Breed Council for their impressive work and commitment to breed health.

    The top twenty includes Leonbergers, Bernese Mountain Dogs and Hungarian Vizslas. Full list of top twenty available here
    http://www.thekarltonindex.com/wordpress/?page_id=116

    At the other end of the scale several breeds are visibly doing so little in terms of breed health that more than twenty score Zero out of 100 and sixty breeds scored less than double figures. Included in this group of breeds is Shih Tzu, Pomeranian and Yorkshire Terrier.
    Full list of poor performing breeds can be found at
    http://www.thekarltonindex.com/wordpress/?page_id=118

    On completing the first full index, Philippa Robinson founder of the Karlton Index says
    "The full review of all breeds has been very enlightening. On the whole findings are disappointing but there are glimpses of brilliant work being done in some quarters like the Dachshund Breed Council and the teams addressing the health agenda in Leonbergers and Vizslas for instance. The teams behind the top performing breeds are characterised by a determined urgency and they tackle health without a hint of complacency.

    But over twenty breeds scored zero, in other words nothing of substance could be found on health. Clearly the claims that media attention and external criticism of dog breeding is unwarranted and unnecessary because breeders are "doing all they can" to improve the health of dogs, are flimsy at best in this group. Many in the bottom twenty breeds came from the Toy group.

    Some of the more controversial breeds like Bulldog, Pug and Neapolitan Mastiff also score poorly despite coming under additional scrutiny from being on the Kennel Club’s list of high profile breeds. I was surprised that many popular breeds like Boxers, Dalmatians and Poodles also came out with low scores.

    The framework is based on recognised business improvement tools and to that end the entire aim of the project is to support the work being done by breed clubs. My conclusions are that the Kennel Club and other interested stakeholders should target resources more effectively for breed clubs. They need much more support to develop balanced health strategies and embark upon meaningful health surveillance."

    The next assessment against the Karlton Index is scheduled for Spring 2013.

    End of press release

    The full listing can be accessed at www.thekarltonindex.com

    Philippa Robinson is a campaigner for better health and welfare in dogs and is a business consultant by profession. Her contact details are email philippa@thekarltonindex.com Telephone 07850 232836
    Margaret C

    Cavaliers......Faith, The Ginger Tank and Woody.
    Japanese Chins.... Dandy, Benny, Bridgette and Hana.
    Remembered with love......... Tommy Tuppence and Fonzi

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    Default While talking about EBVS


    This is from Clare Rusbridge's blog http://clarerusbridge-news.blogspot.com/

    ( and look at the little write-up on CavalierMatters stall underneath this article )


    Estimated Breeding Values (EBVS) for CM/SM in Cavaliers – do we really need them? Who is responsible for the health of the Cavalier Breed?



    It has been five years since the introduction of the International Breeding guidelines for Syringomyelia in 2006. These provided an interim measure for breeders based on existing evidence with a common sense approach until there was better understanding for this complex condition. A Mate Select Scheme that generates estimated breeding values is considered superior. Some breeders consider themselves capable of making their own decisions based on their wealth of breeding experience and knowledge of their own dogs’ MRIs. However CMSM is a complex trait which means that knowing the health status of close relatives is unlikely to be sufficient for predicting the disease free status of the offspring. Information about generations of dogs needs to be taken into account.

    Dr Tom Lewis from the Kennel Club Genetics Centre at the Animal Health Trust has listed the advantages of EBVs below (full details see ‘Genetic Evaluation of Hip Score in UK Labrador Retrievers’ Thomas W. Lewis, Sarah C. Blott, John A. Woolliams ) (Lewis et al, PLoS ONE 5(10): e12797, p7)


    The reasons EBVs are better than phenotypic selection:
    1) EBVs represent the genetic risk only (excludes non-genetic environmental effects). This is the only part consistently transmitted over generations. Since they are 'genetics only' they are a more accurate estimate of genetic risk than phenotype and elicit a greater response at the same selection intensity.
    2) EBVs will further increase in accuracy over time by utilising all available information and being updated as additional info becomes available (e.g. on full sibs, progeny etc).
    3) EBVs will provide predictors for those animals without a phenotypic record (ie MRI scan or heart testing).
    4) EBVs are available from the moment of birth (although all littermates will have the same EBV at this stage)
    5) The EBV will have been corrected for other fixed effects such as sex and age which may bias a phenotype as a predictor of genetic merit.
    Margaret C

    Cavaliers......Faith, The Ginger Tank and Woody.
    Japanese Chins.... Dandy, Benny, Bridgette and Hana.
    Remembered with love......... Tommy Tuppence and Fonzi

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    The Karlton Index...
    A kind of ratemywebsite.com with a slice of lemon stuck on top?

    Sins

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    Quote Originally Posted by sins View Post
    The Karlton Index...
    A kind of ratemywebsite.com with a slice of lemon stuck on top?

    Sins
    Sins,

    I love your way with words.
    Margaret C

    Cavaliers......Faith, The Ginger Tank and Woody.
    Japanese Chins.... Dandy, Benny, Bridgette and Hana.
    Remembered with love......... Tommy Tuppence and Fonzi

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Margaret C View Post
    Sins,

    I love your way with words.
    I second that. Have not read all but will just like to say that the uk cavalier club website has a lot more than the usa clubs. I'm sure rod russell will second that.

    Can I point out something that stood out recently. As unfortunate it is to have our new border collie member join CT due to having SM, I was pleased to see she mentioned that her breeds health representative was interested in Blue and wanted her to keep a journal.

    I have said this before but when I read the book, "for the love of ollie" the canadian clubs health representative was acknowledged and thanked for giving support to sandy smith when she learned about ollie (pat barrington). I think the book was published in 2006? But I thought that seemed similar to this health representative. I don't think pat barrington was the only one acknowledged and I remember ollie's breeder had a letter at the end of the book and was there also.

    If I remember correctly, the breeder mailed letters to her pet owners about the condition. I could be wrong. Anyone who is on this forum and doesn't have a copy of the book, I highly recommend it AND proceeds goes towards research. Www.fortheloveofolle.com



    Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
    Anne Proud mother of Elton 5 and Angel Ella

  8. #8
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    I don't want to single out pat barrington because there have been a couple of other people that have helped me learn more. I think websites are only so much but the health and education committees are so important. The very best thing is the committees that are in contact, spend hours talking and helping pet owners, organizing seminars, contributing to research, etc.




    Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
    Anne Proud mother of Elton 5 and Angel Ella

  9. #9
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    Probably as a result of working for a US multinational for the last 20 years.
    I've lost count of the number of programmes like this to measure everything from performance of quality systems or to measure unsafe behaviours.
    An essential part of these programmes is the reward when progress is made.
    I've spent the last 7 years on a steering committe driving one of those programmes dedicated to measuring continuos improvements in safe behaviours.
    So what was the reward?
    Was it:
    (a) A nice big fat bonus?
    (b) A voucher for marks and spencer?
    (c) An engraved rock?

    Yep,you guessed it...a flippin' rock...granted it was engraved with the company logo.
    I was so excited with the rock,I nearly dropped it on my foot and wrecked the company record for accident free days.
    To make it worse,two of the lads came in from the chemistry lab to see the expression on my face when I opened my gift box with the rock inside.
    I'm sure the cavalier club committee will experience the same thrill when they get their reward for moving up the points level on the Karlton Index.
    Sins

  10. #10
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    I really don't know anything about the person behind the project but I'm not at all sold on the methodology used,especially the way the breed club related web resources are reviewed and catalogued.
    The cavalier Club website is actually very strong on health information.
    Can't see how the Impact rating is zero.
    Sins

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