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Thread: Low Platelets

  1. #11
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    Thank you Rod, I will see what is gonna happen after i said to my friend all about this especially this part of Diagnosis -- DNA Testing in cavalierhealth.org; "However, many veterinarians who are ignorant about the cavaliers' benign disorder hurriedly conclude that the dog is suffering from immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT), which is a very serious autoimmune disease in which the dog's body attacks its own blood platelets as though they are a pathogenic bacteria or virus."

    Hopefully the vet agrees and stops steroids...
    Ebru&Duses

  2. #12
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    I have to agree with the others, please don't let them put your dog on steroids without knowing what is really going on. I have several friends whose dogs developed diabetes after being on steroids for an extended length of time.
    Cindy and Claire
    Claire was born on Feb7, 2010

  3. #13
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    If the vet doesn't stop them, I'd as an owner refuse to give them to an otherwise healthy dog if there is no sign of a problem except blood tests in a breed where low platelet counts exist in a third of dogs simply because they have large platelets, not a lack of them. If there are other considerations that's a different issue but from your description an otherwise healthy dog with absolutely no health problems or symptoms is being given steroids. No, no, no!!!

    Steroids are one of the most powerful of drugs with some of the most serious -- including life-limiting -- side effects in high or long term doses. They can be absolutely critical for some illnesses and can also give quality of life where there is little -- but using them must be very carefully considered if for anything other than short term high dose/fast taper situations (eg for a painful short-term inflammation/injury). Long term or in high doses they can cause disease including diabetes, organ problems, osteoporosis, weight gain -- just a huge list of problems.

    The dog cannot just stop taking them however, they have to be tapered off, generally (depending on the dose) or cutting them off abruptly can cause a serious health situation on their own.

    I speak as someone well familiar (unfortunately!) with steroids as I have had to take them at a low dose for 18 months for a type of arthritis (should be off them very shortly... yay!).

    Many vets are far too liberal-handed with steroids as they can come across to the owner as a miracle drug -- they will stop many symptoms and improve pain dramatically for example -- but this is a *serious* drug and not one I would give unless with very good reasons for long term care. Or at all, in the case of this dog and this situation, as described.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommytoClaire View Post
    I have to agree with the others, please don't let them put your dog on steroids without knowing what is really going on. I have several friends whose dogs developed diabetes after being on steroids for an extended length of time.
    noo, i would not put my dog on steroids...I am a person who hates to take medication till it is necessary. So, if my dog has to take pills it is because we dont have any choice ) thank you, love ))
    Ebru&Duses

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karlin View Post
    If the vet doesn't stop them, I'd as an owner refuse to give them to an otherwise healthy dog if there is no sign of a problem except blood tests in a breed where low platelet counts exist in a third of dogs simply because they have large platelets, not a lack of them. If there are other considerations that's a different issue but from your description an otherwise healthy dog with absolutely no health problems or symptoms is being given steroids. No, no, no!!!

    Steroids are one of the most powerful of drugs with some of the most serious -- including life-limiting -- side effects in high or long term doses. They can be absolutely critical for some illnesses and can also give quality of life where there is little -- but using them must be very carefully considered if for anything other than short term high dose/fast taper situations (eg for a painful short-term inflammation/injury). Long term or in high doses they can cause disease including diabetes, organ problems, osteoporosis, weight gain -- just a huge list of problems.

    The dog cannot just stop taking them however, they have to be tapered off, generally (depending on the dose) or cutting them off abruptly can cause a serious health situation on their own.

    I speak as someone well familiar (unfortunately!) with steroids as I have had to take them at a low dose for 18 months for a type of arthritis (should be off them very shortly... yay!).

    Many vets are far too liberal-handed with steroids as they can come across to the owner as a miracle drug -- they will stop many symptoms and improve pain dramatically for example -- but this is a *serious* drug and not one I would give unless with very good reasons for long term care. Or at all, in the case of this dog and this situation, as described.
    Hi Karlin,

    they are off to steroids for sometime, they have a heart promblem now i am not sure but it might be because of stereoids I asked if it was MVD but she said no. She said the vet saw some liquid around the dog's heart or something like this. Oh boy, i think she needs another vet as she does not know what the real problem is. everytime i asked about something she answers unconsciously, maybe her vet doesnt explain anything, i dont know. i said second opinion might be helpful once and she said she believed in her vet, i keep telling time to time but i hope this does not end sadly
    Ebru&Duses

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