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Thread: Charlie is bring neutered tomorrow

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  1. #1
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    Default Charlie is bring neutered tomorrow

    He is almost 7 months and I feel like this is the right time for him although I wish we didn't have to do it at all.

    I've been lying awake worrying when I need sleep! I'm afraid he will hate me for leaving him there and I know he will be crying loads when I leave

    Just needed to share, I worry about everything and anything all the time!

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    Seven months is much too young to castrate. He needs those hormones to grow properly. especially his bones. I'd wait a year.
    Rod Russell

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    http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...technique.aspx

    I saw an article that neuter can be done via injection instead of surgery. Link is above.

    Kitty

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    If you research......most Veterinarians ( even those well-known & respected) will say between 6 - 12 months of age.
    Even Animal Behavorist ~ Victoria Stilwell suggests earlier rather than later.

    No research is perfect, and no experience is absolute. In reality, there are very few definite "right" answers. The best answer to most questions is to find a Vet who you trust to tell you the whole story and make your decision based on the pro's & cons of that information.

    Early neutering is a controversial topic. A very few uncontrolled studies have shown a link with early neuters (before 14 months of age) and some forms of cancer and joint problems. Both the joint problems and the cancers that they have linked are relatively common in large-boned dogs, so the challenge is to prove whether the early neuter actually caused an increase in the incidence. There have been no studies that prove this. Waiting to neuter seems to offer fewer advantages for smaller dogs than larger ones.

    Spaying females before 6 months is less controversial than neutering; preventing the first heat nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer which is much more common than bone cancer.

    ....also.... we have always brought our dogs home the same day after their surgery. IF you discuss this with your Vet..most of the time they will be agreeable. The office itself usually closes at 6 p.m...& the dogs are left till morning w/ no supervision. So therefore bringing them home w/ YOU being able to monitor it throughout the night is far better IMO. Should there be a problem ( which most likely there will NOT be)..there is always an emergency number to call.
    We also opted for the lazer surgery which is far less invasive..and they heal much quicker. They didn't really even need the cones. ( Honestly..dogs are not so stupid as to lick open their stitches. We have NEVER had ANY of our dogs over the last 30 yrs. even try!)
    Last edited by DZee; 18th September 2012 at 07:03 AM.
    *Diane ~ Mom to~
    Wrigley ( Cavalier) Zeb ( Labrador) & Jake ( Labradoodle)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DZee View Post
    If you research......most Veterinarians ( even those well-known & respected) will say between 6 - 12 months of age.
    Even Animal Behavorist ~ Victoria Stilwell suggests earlier rather than later.

    No research is perfect, and no experience is absolute. In reality, there are very few definite "right" answers. The best answer to most questions is to find a Vet who you trust to tell you the whole story and make your decision based on the pro's & cons of that information.

    [COLOR=#4D4D4D]Early neutering is a controversial topic. A very few uncontrolled studies have shown a link with early neuters (before 14 months of age) and some forms of cancer and joint problems. Both the joint problems and the cancers that they have linked are relatively common in large-boned dogs, so the challenge is to prove whether the early neuter actually caused an increase in the incidence. There have been no studies that prove this. Waiting to neuter seems to offer fewer advantages for smaller dogs than larger ones.

    Spaying females before 6 months is less controversial than neutering; preventing the first heat nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer which is much more common than bone cancer. ...
    I totally disagree with you on this. I don't think you've done your homework, and you are making very risky assumptlons without sufficient research. But, go ahead. Take that big risk. Risk hindering the dog's development to maturity. I would never take that risk with a cavalier. The breed has too many genetic strikes against it as it is. Ignore these experts:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18052800

    http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf

    http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...g.aspx?np=true

    This one is on the falsehood that early spaying eliminates the risk of mammary cancer:
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...1.01220.x/full

    Here is an AKC podcast released just this month: Early Spay and Neuter. In this podcast we hear from Dr. Benjamin Hart, a distinguished professor emeritus and active researcher at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Hart is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and discusses his CHF-funded research into the health implications of spay and neuter in Golden Retrievers, the results of which he and his research team have just submitted for publication.

    http://www.akcchf.org/news-events/mu...nd-neuter.html
    Last edited by RodRussell; 18th September 2012 at 07:26 AM.
    Rod Russell

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    It's a bit offensive to assume if we choose to have our dog neutered or spayed prior to maturity we obviously don't care if our beloved pet/s are at risk.
    There is still a lot yet totally understood on this subject..as it is still controversial.
    I guess it's a little like politics...depends on who you are listening to.
    It's sad that we cannot have an exchange of thoughts without being made to feel we are complete idiots.
    I too have done research & my statements were made on everything I have ever read.
    Perhaps all the reasons given for many years as to WHY to neuter & spay are just complete myths???
    .. I don't honestly know.
    All I shared in my previous posts came from well known Vet (experts) as well.
    I pretty much copied what they had wrote.
    Obviously there has been some new discoveries regarding this.

    Yes..Dr. Hart speaks of the advantages of waiting regarding LARGER breeds ( his research was w/ golden retrievers).
    There is still not significant evidence that it benefits a smaller breed to wait till sexual maturity.

    Here is where I got what you obviously consider (mis) information....

    http://www.cesarsway.com/askthevet/b...neuter-or-spay

    http://www.akcchf.org/canine-health/...st-age-at.html

    http://www.petmd.com/blogs/dailyvet/...0#.UFgNw7KPWeE
    Last edited by DZee; 18th September 2012 at 10:26 AM.
    *Diane ~ Mom to~
    Wrigley ( Cavalier) Zeb ( Labrador) & Jake ( Labradoodle)

  7. #7
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    I agree DZee, just had my lovely Sasha spayed at 8 mths after having two bitches not spayed who went on to suffer with Mammory Tumours, its the best decision for Sasha's future health as far as i am concerned x

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    When I woke up this morning to read the first reply I was pretty shocked and Charlie had his appointment at 9am. I stuck to my decision as I had done all the research beforehand and decided based on his growth and behaviour (especially roaming issues!!) that this was around the right time to do it along with a trusted vet's advice. We also took Harry in at around this time in his life and never had any problems re: that department. I also considered his ability at 7 months to be able to bounce back pretty quickly from his op with hopefully no negative physical or emotional repercussions.

    I was upset leaving him but he seemed ok and I pick him up at 6:20.

    Sorry for sparking a heated debate

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    Don't apologise; it is always a good debate to have because people are often confused and worried and the issue comes up regularly.

    If people wish to wait til their dog is a year or so that is entirely a personal choice. There are to me, significant health reasons not to wait longer than after a single heat for a female for those who choose to wait. But I think evidence AGAINST neutering before one is inconclusive.

    The AKC Canine Health Foundation article I think gives a good conclusion -- there are good reasons to spay a female and to spay after 6 months and before first heat. With males you can balance out the pros and cons on the health arguments -- but the writer fails to return to one of the strongest initial arguments in the article, the behavioural issues.

    In my experience it is unwanted male behaviours coupled with the drive of an intact male to roam that argue for neutering, as well as preventing unwanted litters and more pound deaths, not the health issues that are primary.

    I do not think it responsible to look at neutering only as a health discussion -- if anything, the behaviour issues leading to higher risk of death, and the welfare issues, are even more persuasive.

    BTW of all the cavaliers I took out of the pounds here in Ireland over the years, most of them males, I can only recall one that was neutered.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

  10. #10
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    I agree don't apologize the when to neuter is still up for debate. Personally I think people being passionate about their opinions is good for the breed. After all we all want what is best for our dogs, the breed and ourselves. There is obviously both positive and negatives on both sides of this issue. The bottom line is it comes down to what's right for you and your dog. It reminds me of the breastfeeding issue in humans......do what works for you and your baby even if its a furbaby

    I'm sure Charlie will be fine. I know it makes for a hard day. Sending happy thoughts!!!!
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
    -Roger Caras

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