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Thread: May be a stupid question but... Before vaccinations?

  1. #1
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    Default May be a stupid question but... Before vaccinations?

    If I take my puppy out with me before she has had her full set of vaccinations, I am aware I should not put her on the ground or let her meet other dogs... But i want to still take her outside on some trips in a carrier to see the world etc. Now how/where would I let her have a toilet break whilst I am out with her?


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  2. #2
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    I would find an out of the way spot not likely have been visited by other dogs and let her do her business. She can probably walk safey on cement sidewalks if the weather is dry, as well.

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    Dry weather/pavements are hard to find at the moment with all the snow etc Even when we go to the vets at the end of the week etc she will need to relieve herself at one point before we get home!


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    I solved this problem by walking Fletcher down the middle of our neighborhood streets. We live in an area where cars don't come and go so much especially in the middle of the of the day. May not be an option for you.
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
    -Roger Caras

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    It might make sense to get a pair of booties, or there are latex paw covers (similar to human latex gloves). Then just pull off the mitts after walking and no worries about picking up anything. It will also protect if someone has salted the walkways, which is extremely painful.

  6. #6
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    Dry pavements wouldn't necessarily be any safer from distemper/parvo than grass. These can live for 6 months in very harsh conditions.

    I don't think booties would make much realistic difference either unless

    - you sterilise the booties to start with
    - you carefully remove them with rubber glves, not allowing any part of the bootie to touch you or her or any item she can comein contact with
    - you sterilise the booties fully again immediately (which will require a special cleaning agent)
    - and store them in an environment that is safe til next use

    The reality is that you are not that likely to come in contact with any of these things in the very short time you would put her on the grass/ground, let her relieve herself, and pick her back up -- I just wouldn't use a park frequented by dogs or an area of the street or a grass verge likely to have had visiting dogs.

    FWIW there are breeders and trainers who also feel it is important not to totally isolate a pup during this puppy vax period anyway and take some calculated risk as if they are not thoroughly socialised and meet lots of 'safe' dogs in this period (not just people) you lose the most important windows for dog-gog socialising that help guarantee you won't end up with a poorly socialised problem dog. I know breeders who take pups during this vax period to dog shows for example --right or wrong -- but have never heard them having problems.

    I would attend puppy classes and have play dates with vaxed older dogs all during this time to prevent such problems. If you read After You Get Your Puppy (the free book download linked to in many threads on puppies here! Or just google it) you will se the internationally regarded trainer Dr ian Dunbar positively insists on socialising pups widely well during this period. You are def getting her out and about which is great!
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  7. #7
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    Read this!

    http://www.diamondsintheruff.com/ear...alization.html

    http://www.diamondsintheruff.com/socialization.html

    Quotes:

    “The primary and most important time for puppy socialization is the first three months of life… For this reason, the AVSAB believes that it should be the standard of care for puppies to receive such socialization before they are fully vaccinated… While puppies’ immune systems are still developing during these early months… appropriate care makes the risk of infection relatively small compared to the chance of death from a behavior problem.” - The American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior

    and

    Linda Michaels:
    "Dr. Lee Harris, DVM, San Diego, along with other progressive veterinarians, tell us, "“Concern has been raised about exposing puppies to infectious diseases before they are completely immunized. Some common sense needs to be exerted about exposure risks (don’t take the 10 week old puppy to a dog park!), but damage done by lack of early socialization is more dangerous to the dog in the long run than the risk of encountering a serious virus in well-chosen socialization exposures. The American Veterinary Medical Association realizes this, and their official recommendation is that that socialization concerns outweigh immunization issues, and puppies should be well socialized to people, dogs, cats, vehicles, and noises early in life. Canine mental health depends on it!” "

    I have always had my pups over to meet older vaccinated dogs after their first vax.

    Note if puppies are actually homed at 10-12 weeks and not the (IMHO far too early) 8 weeks then they have the enormous benefit of continued puppy and adult dog socialisation with the breeder. One major reason why taking a pup at only 7 (shudder) or 8 weeks can be less than ideal for both pup and the recipient new owner, who by waiting til 10-12 weeks, gets a better adjusted, better housetrained, better socialised, more balanced and mature puppy still with all its cuteness intact and vax cycle done or close to done, ready for puppy classes.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  8. #8
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    I stay away from areas that might have a large amount of stray dog traffic. Mostly parks and walking trails in my area. I also don't allow puppy on the vet office floor. For me socialization is more important to risk of disease, this of course after 2 set of shots.

  9. #9
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    Thank you Karlin, you have been very very helpful!

    I also think its so important to start socialising because she will be 11 weeks old by the time all the jabs are finished. I just can't imagine locking her in the house and not taking her to places to me.

    It has made me feel better about it, I will stay away from obvious places and make sure I put her down only for wee breaks and pick her up again.

    I have both Ian Dunbars downloads and am in the process of working trough them! Thank you again Last question, how long should I carry on with the hourly crating routine? A couple of weeks or less or more? x


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