Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Glad and Sad For Cavaliers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Glad and Sad For Cavaliers

    We are new to this forum and also to Cavaliers. What a delightful breed this is. You can't help but love them. Everyone just has to say hello and pet and snuggle our Jenny, who is almost 1 year now. It's really sad for me to think about all the potential health issues that this breed has. It just doesn't seem right that these nice little dogs carry these big health burdens. We will love and care for Jenny as best we can. We probably would not have gotten her if we had done our research better. As least now we can be better prepared mentally for the future we hope will never happen. Still forewarned is forearmed. We'll try not to be focused on the health issues and just take it one day at a time. Are there others who have similar feelings?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Northern California, USA
    Posts
    385
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes, I think many here and elsewhere are saddened by their potential problems. If your Jenny is still quite young, you might consider getting health insurance for her. It's cheaper when there are no pre-existing conditions. Its good to have the wherewithal to provide them with any and all healthcare they need.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    60
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Nope! I couldn't be happier with my cavvie. I read books about the breed and got her without any concern (from an established breeder). I take good care of her (proper food, diet, exercise) and fully follow her vet's instructions. She is an absolute delight and brings nothing but joy to this old guy. I won't consider any other breed - in my mind, they are the best! No regrets, happy, happy, happy. Enjoy your little one!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,421
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes, I share your feeling about all the hereditary health problems this breed faces. Educate yourself, buy pet medical insurance, and find the balance between worry and enjoy.


    I think every person has to decide for themselves if owning a cavalier is worth the risk.
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
    -Roger Caras

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    West Yorkshire, England.
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I can understand your thoughts but equally you have to weigh up the fact that this breed is beautiful, gentle and heaven sent. Yes, your little love may face things you would rather they didnt, but thats nature. Bad health can happen to all of us. Make sure you have the right insurance to fight whatever the future throws at you, put it in a drawer and then just enjoy every moment of every day you can with your pup. It can go so fast, there isnt time to worry about the 'what ifs'.
    Lynne x
    Little Ted Bear - Ruby Boy Born December 8th 2012
    Beautiful Megan - Black & Tan. Left us 18th January 2013. My heart and soul.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What we are trying to follow now is:

    "Yesterday's history; Tomorrow's a mystery; Today is a gift; That's why it's called the present."

    Any recommendations for a good pet insurance company in California? Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynne View Post
    I can understand your thoughts but equally you have to weigh up the fact that this breed is beautiful, gentle and heaven sent. Yes, your little love may face things you would rather they didnt, but thats nature. Bad health can happen to all of us. Make sure you have the right insurance to fight whatever the future throws at you, put it in a drawer and then just enjoy every moment of every day you can with your pup. It can go so fast, there isnt time to worry about the 'what ifs'.
    Very sorry for your recent loss. We had a loss (JackRussell age 15) over a year ago and I'm still not recovered from it. The dog pic in your avatar is very very close to what Jenny looks like. I'll have to get a pic up. Thank you for the kind words.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    We rescued Charlie just over a year ago knowing he had SM. His meds are a little more expensive than we expected, but we have him signed up as a non-insured patient at Costco and get a good price. But, more to the point, he just goes on with his live. He's a happy little boy, and full of life even at 4. He walks weird sometimes, he shadow scratches when he walks, but doesn't let it bother it. He never shows any sign of pain, just discomfort.

    It seems to me that if SM is caused to some degree by having too small a skull then breeders could start breeding accordingly and get these beautiful pets beyond this disease in a few generations instead of getting worse as it is now.

    TomA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Tom. Thanks for taking on a rescue dog. It's nice to hear that Charlie and his family are "working things out." Here's a thread where I asked SM and breeding.

    http://www.cavaliertalk.com/forums/s...-Out-MV-and-SM

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Posts
    1,785
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Tom spoke of SM being caused in part 'by having too small a skull'. This isn't strictly true. What seems to happen is that the skull finishes growing and should tell the brain to stop growing as well, but the skull/brain communication doesn't work and the brain goes on growing for a bit, thereby crowding the skull. So breeding for bigger heads isn't going to make much difference, because it's more a matter of too big a brain rather than too small a skull. The foetal tissue project at the Royal Veterinary College is trying to discover what causes the skull/brain communication to break down - it seems to happen very early in life.

    My rescue Aled also has SM - he didn't when I got him but as a puppy farm dog the risk was always high. I hate to think what would have happened to him if he had stayed undiagnosed in his kennel, though so far his symptoms are fairly mild, but gradually getting worse. But Cavaliers have such a capacity for enjoying life and making the most of what they can do, and like Charlie, you appreciate every moment with them.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •