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Thread: average weight and height of a cavlier

  1. #1
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    Default average weight and height of a cavlier

    I just picked up my first cavalier last nite, he is 12 weeks old and is about 12" tall and weighs 11 lbs 8 oz. Is this a normal height and weight for him at this age?
    Sheila

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    That seems kind of big. Is he stocky, or long and gangly (this is a puppy phase, they grow up to look fine)?

    It really depends though, Thistle barely grew after 6 months, Guinness kept growing past 1 year, and at 3, is still visibly filling out.

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    Looks like he's going to be a very big dog.His weight sounds right for his height,but at maturity,he's going to be well up to size and then some!
    Not a problem if he's a happy healthy pet..take him to your vet for a routine check up,if you've just bought him.
    Sins
    Sharing my sofa with Holly, Ivy,Lilly and Hazy.. and never forgetting our beautiful Daisy who reached the bridge too soon.

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    When Fletcher was a young pup we (the vet and I) thought he was going to be on the bigger size of "standard sized" if not over. Which who really cares? I mean he's not a show dog and I don't care as long as he's healthy. Well Fletcher just turned a year old and I know he may still grow a bit but he weights 16 lbs now. So I think you can never tell.
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
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    It is possible that this is a very very large example of the breed, as others note.

    However to be honest, and I am sorry to say this, I would wonder about whether you were sold a puppy that is only 12 weeks old. That sounds to me more like a dog that might be at least 6 months old. I have seen this happen before with certain types of breeders, who have older dogs they failed to sell and offer them as far younger than they truly are. Otherwise, I would wonder whether this is a cavalier, or perhaps a cross of some sort to a larger breed. Most cavalier puppies would not be that size and weight til at least around 6 months. As others note, the weight is fine for the height of the dog, but normally that would be a far older dog. I have two mature, adult dogs that size and weight (actually, a little shorter).

    What does your vet say about this pup's size and age? Can you post a couple of pictures? Many here would likely be able to tell you whether it is likely that your puppy is 12 weeks old. The pic you posted on your intro thread to me does look like an older puppy than 12 weeks -- but also his muzzle is longish which might suggest there's some cocker or similar larger spaniel in his background, accounting for his size. His nose is still not fully black and assuming this isn't a fault (eg the pigmentation may remain mixed pink and black) that could also indicate a younger puppy that is just very oversized, as most noses fill in by 6 months.

    Much depends on the quality and honesty of your breeder. Ideally s/he is not a backyard breeder or puppy farmer using some of the meaningless registration services for this puppy -- in other words, as a very basic starting point (but still no real indication of the quality of the breeder), the breeder should be registering puppies either with the AKC or the CKCSC in the US, and no other registry. Then you would have at least, evidence that the breeder claimed this litter was born on a specific date. They could still make up this information sadly -- as there is no way except DNA testing to verify their claims -- but too few breeders do this voluntarily and most won't, I think, til it is mandatory.

    If the puppy is registered AKC or CKCSC and your vet feels there is no way this is a 12 week old puppy, then you can file a complaint against the breeder.

    If the breeder has neither of these registry affiliations (AKC or CKCSC), then unfortunately there's no way of knowing if you have a cavalier, or a cross, or the family history as many such breeders are not likely to be honest about background and other 'pet' registries used widely by backyard breeders and puppy mills, will register absolutely anything. No reputable breeder uses them.

    All that said -- there are definitely some large cavaliers out there -- I've had one as large as 35lbs adult size in rescue -- but that large is really rare and probably means somewhere in the background of that line their was a larger breed. The origin of the breed as it was reconstructed in the early to mid part of last century is a bit murky and some lines it is claimed included larger spaniel breeds and larger sized dogs may be throwing back to those. It is all a subject of much discussion amongst cavalier fans. There are many previous threads here with input from some knowledgeable people on the origins of the breed.

    For a cavalier to be that large at that age would suggest you will end up with a dog weighing up around 30+ lbs or so -- most cavalier puppies that age would be perhaps around half that weight, perhaps a little more but not much. Most cavaliers won;t have reached that height -- which is the full standard height for an adult -- for many more months, suggesting you will also have a much taller dog (more cocker or small springer spaniel size).

    What would most concern me here is that the breeder did not fully discuss the very large size of this puppy with you, if he is truly 1) 12 weeks old and/or 2) a cavalier -- this would be a very non-standard dog and any cavalier breeder should have been aware of this and had some sort of explanation (just as one also should for a very undersized puppy).

    Of course what matters at core here, is that you love your dog and size should not matter. Breed standards matter primarily for showing dogs, not for our pets. But if there's the possibility that a breeder has been deceptive, I would want to take action against that (though there are so few protections for puppy buyers that there's likely little that can be done even if they did sell an older dog as a younger one).
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

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    Here are some pic's of my big boy, his registration says he was born 12/9/12. No matter what size we still love him.


    Sheila

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    His face and body are very much "puppy". I would guess he's 4 months old, not 3. But he's definitely still a pup.

    And he looks like a cavalier to me. He won't be earning any conformation titles, but you didn't buy him to be a show dog.

    Anyway, he looks like a sweet, cuddly guy. Just more to love.

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    Now that I see these pictures I'm thinking he may be older too or a cross breed (tho he looks very very cavalier) 2 things strike me first the pink of his nose if he as much older the pink would be gone and second the length of his ear hair is short and his chest hair (and other hair) is rather fluffy.... I think its something you need to talk to your vet about as soon as possible BECAUSE if he IS older and you have intact female dogs in your house___________________ say no more. While I'm sure cavalier+ dachshund pup might be cute but as you know cavaliers have a ton of genetic health problems, and an accidental litter would be very irresponsible.

    I think he is adorable no matter what. No wonder you are in love with him immediately, I would be too.
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
    -Roger Caras

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    I plan 2 keep him away from the dachshunds when they go into heat, he is way to big. As soon as I can make an appointment I am taking him to the vet to see what he thinks. If he is a mix I think I may no what he is a mix of (bull dog).
    Sheila

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    I doubt he would be a bulldog cross -- though that said, sometimes crosses look like one or the other breed and size may be the only indicator of the other parent. I had cavalier crosses born of a rescue mother who came out looking like lab puppies -- they grew to the size of labs and have lab coats but are slightly reddish in colour. I wouldn't believe they had a drop of cavalier except they were born from a rescue cavalier we had in foster.

    I would suspect he is older than the breeder stated. If he is doing things like lifting his leg to pee rather than squatting then he is likely closer to 6 months. On the other hand, a larger breed could well be a generation or more back innhis history-- especially if the breeder isn't someone who is club-involved and an experienced cavalier breeder. Some irresponsible breeders just let dogs mix, aren;t careful about who is in heat, and keep numerous breeds to sell. Easy for one breed to cross with another in those situations. Then they just breed back to one breed (generally the one they get more money for) and sell the puppies as that breed. It's why DNA registration should really be mandatory on AKC and CKCSC registrations (and internationally).

    I think you do need to consider neutering him or spaying the dachshunds -- it is extremely difficult to manage both intact males and females responsibly in one house, even for experienced breeders. That's whey very few show breeders keep both males and females, unless they are fully kenneled dogs (a life in kennels though is a sad situation for the dogs) as it is a real challenge. It can be very hard to tell when a female has gone into heat -- until there's an accidents -- and your dachshunds would run a serious fatality risk of being unable to pass puppies from an accidental mating with a much larger male (in rescue we do emergency spays if we suspect the father is a far larger dog for this reason -- except on th cavalier above -- she was very thin when she came in and wed no idea she was pregnant rather than putting on needed weight, nor did the vets, til it was too late!). If you keep them intact you are going to have to keep them fully separated for at least 4 weeks; most breeders would say 5-6 is safer.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

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