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Thread: Traveling with a new puppy

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  1. #1
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    Default Traveling with a new puppy

    I browsed the library but I could have missed information on this. My parents are going to be the proud owners of a Blenheim boy. I'm sure the breeder will be able to give some advice but I wanted to get any helpful tips I can for them.

    They will be driving to meet the breeder, mom, puppy etc. which is a very long drive. They will be spending one night on the way up and one on the way back. A long drive for a new puppy will need all the comfort they can have. I was reading that they may get car sick and other articles about getting them used to a car but how can one prepare? I have small travel crates but I'm sure they will want the best thing for him.

    Any tips, things to buy, help that I can share with them?

    Thank you
    Anne Proud mother of Elton 5 and Angel Ella

  2. #2
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    We just came back from south Florida with my sister-in-law's new 9 week old standard Poodle last weekend. We had a small hard-sided crate, attached with a seat belt on the rear seat, with the door facing inward. I sat next to the crate and periodically let the puppy out for some attention and then put her back in to rest. This was a two-plus hour ride, so it was not a longish one and did not involve any feedings.

    I would take a crate and use it in the car as described above, with a comfortable, soft pad on the bottom. I would have one of the new owners sit beside the crate and puppy in the rear seat and be able to give the dog attention periodically. Give the puppy plenty of opportunities to rest in the crate, so the play time should be much less than the rest time, and if the dog is asleep, I would not wake it up to play. I would stop for breaks on the ground as often as the breeder recommends.

    For feeding, I would bring back enough of the food the breeder has been feeding, to at least last the length of the trip, and feed the puppy as often as the breeder recommends. Don't forget a dish for the food. Also, take plenty of water and a dish for water, too.

    Overnight, I would take the crate into the room and place it next to the bed, close enough to be able to reach down to the gate and stick my fingers through the gate to touch the puppy periodically. I would keep the puppy in the crate all night, except for a break or two outside.

    Don't forget a small collar and a light-weight but sturdy leash. Never let the dog out without being on the leash.
    Rod Russell

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post
    We just came back from south Florida with my sister-in-law's new 9 week old standard Poodle last weekend. We had a small hard-sided crate, attached with a seat belt on the rear seat, with the door facing inward. I sat next to the crate and periodically let the puppy out for some attention and then put her back in to rest. This was a two-plus hour ride, so it was not a longish one and did not involve any feedings.

    I would take a crate and use it in the car as described above, with a comfortable, soft pad on the bottom. I would have one of the new owners sit beside the crate and puppy in the rear seat and be able to give the dog attention periodically. Give the puppy plenty of opportunities to rest in the crate, so the play time should be much less than the rest time, and if the dog is asleep, I would not wake it up to play. I would stop for breaks on the ground as often as the breeder recommends.

    For feeding, I would bring back enough of the food the breeder has been feeding, to at least last the length of the trip, and feed the puppy as often as the breeder recommends. Don't forget a dish for the food. Also, take plenty of water and a dish for water, too.

    Overnight, I would take the crate into the room and place it next to the bed, close enough to be able to reach down to the gate and stick my fingers through the gate to touch the puppy periodically. I would keep the puppy in the crate all night, except for a break or two outside.

    Don't forget a small collar and a light-weight but sturdy leash. Never let the dog out without being on the leash.
    Thanks Rod!

    I already know that mom went in the back seat to calm my "puppy" Elton down when he was having travel anxiety so I'm sure that will not be a problem

    Those are really good ideas and tips. Now I just need to be able to prepare Elton and make sure I know how to handle him around a puppy especially given some of his behavioral issues.
    Anne Proud mother of Elton 5 and Angel Ella

  4. #4
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    I agree with Rod's suggestions. One thing I would add is for the overnight stay, you don't always know if you're going to get a room with easy access outside for potty breaks. It may be a good idea to have a few of the potty training pads especially for the nighttime.
    Joyce - Proudly owned & loved by

    BellaMia (Aug. 30, 2012) My Beautiful Ruby Milo (Jan. 20, 2014) My Handsome Tri
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  5. #5
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    When I brought Fletcher home at 12 weeks is was a 6 hour drive and I was the only human in the car. I planned for the trip to take me a lot longer because I would need to stop for potty/play breaks, however he slept most of the way. I used a hard travel crate and buckled it in the back. I have had Fletcher stay in a hotel twice so far, once he was about 4 months old so he was only on the leash for potty/outside time or in the crate. The other time was a few weeks ago I again did not allow him the run of the room, he was leashed or crated. I personally HATE potty training pads but its a good idea to make sure your parents have PLENTY of old towels or something for bedding (and plastics bags LOTS)
    Melissa
    "If you don't own a dog, at least one, there is not necessarily anything wrong with you, but there may be something wrong with your life."
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    Gracie has very bad car sickness so whenever possible I try to not feed her within 3 hours of a car trip. My vet also gave dosing information for gravol (also called dramamine) for car sickness and it really helps. The dosing is 1 mg per pound, I bought the cherry flavoured children's chewables which are 15mg and they think they're a treat. It also helps to calm them down a bit so they relax in the car.

    I brought Lady on an airplane when she was about 4-5 months old and I did bring training pads thinking it was too long of a time for her to go without peeing, but she ended up being just fine. Since you're driving you'll be able to stop every couple of hours so that shouldn't be a problem.

    I used potty pads with Lady in my apartment for the first few months and she easily transitioned out of them once she got older and could hold it longer. I found them really helpful for in the middle of the night when she wanted to pee. Some people say they can "mess up" potty training but I had no issues at all they just made training easier for us.
    Courtney
    Lady (1.5 year old tricolour) & Gracie (4 year old blenheim)
    "Happiness is a warm puppy" - Charles M. Schulz

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