Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 117

Thread: Vets that have knowledge on SM in the Solihull area?

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    69
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi everyone!Stephanie did get back to us and said she couldnt rise the Gabapentin dosage at this stage as it was still too early. She said he he declined any more, to come in and see if we can put him on any other medication and maybe raise the dosage.We are a little worried about his progress as he is displaying new symptoms. His eyes when they go red, go really badly red too (like an almost bloody kind of a red) but before bed tonight, his eyes were back to a normal color. I could see he was in quite a bit of pain today just by his look . Hopefully we can get this sorted for him, I know theres not a cure but hopefully some sort of medication that can help with this kind of pain would be wonderful. Our Neuro did say that we could put him on other medications but she doesnt want to do that because they would be steroids and they would have side effects.Anyway, wel keep you posted!

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    797
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    My heart goes out to you both. It's so hard to watch this happening sometimes while loving them so much but being unable to help them. You have done all you can for now by speaking to Stephanie and now Ziggy is starting to feel better. I think there must be quite a few of us who have had to watch our dogs having a bad time during this period of unusual weather events. My Rebel has had to have his medicines tweaked due to similar reactions to it also, but he too is now improving.

    I can only help a little by reminding you that we are all here to listen to your concerns and to try to bring as much comfort as we can. There will be a workable solution for Ziggy somewhere at the end of the tunnel, but perhaps not quite yet.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo & the ByFloSin Cavaliers
    Rebel, Winston Alexander,Little Joe & Holly Poppet
    Birmingham, UK

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Posts
    1,834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's normal to have to tweak the medication for SM for a few weeks to find the dosage that is best for your particular dog. Dr Rusbridge regards steroids as the last option, when all other pain control has been tried and failed, because of their side effects. The maximum dosage for gabapentin is 300mg x 3 daily, so Ziggy still has quite a way to go on that, and some dogs do better on a refined form of gabapentin called Lyrica (prednisone). SM dogs are definitely affected by changes in air pressure, and that has been going wild lately, leaping up and down by 20 millibars a day. Even my normally well-controlled Oliver has had to have an occasional extra gabapentin because the changes in pressure were making his head ache.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hatfield, Herts, UK
    Posts
    2,722
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kate H View Post
    It's normal to have to tweak the medication for SM for a few weeks to find the dosage that is best for your particular dog. Dr Rusbridge regards steroids as the last option, when all other pain control has been tried and failed, because of their side effects. The maximum dosage for gabapentin is 300mg x 3 daily, so Ziggy still has quite a way to go on that, and some dogs do better on a refined form of gabapentin called Lyrica (prednisone). SM dogs are definitely affected by changes in air pressure, and that has been going wild lately, leaping up and down by 20 millibars a day. Even my normally well-controlled Oliver has had to have an occasional extra gabapentin because the changes in pressure were making his head ache.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled
    I think you've had a Senior Moment here Kate. Lyrica is pregablin not prednisone.

    ZigsBro, although I agree that steroids are usually kept as a last option the most important thing is that your little dog should have his pain controlled. Quality of life is what should count most.

    You know your boy best. He cannot speak for himself so you need to be his advocate when talking to the neurologist. Don't leave it too long if he continues to deteriorate, take him back and ask for his medication to be reassessed
    Margaret C

    Cavaliers......Faith, The Ginger Tank and Woody.
    Japanese Chins.... Dandy, Benny, Bridgette and Hana.
    Remembered with love......... Tommy Tuppence and Fonzi

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Posts
    1,834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    You're right of course, Margaret - neither of mine have been on Lyrica, so I always think of it as Lyrica and forget its 'proper' name.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    23,983
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    I'd just add that it is never, ever 'too early' to address pain. If the dosage of gabapentin isn't working than the goal should be to raise it if that fits within the correct limits of dosage, and resolve the pain. Or add in other meds (steroids are the very last resort -- Clare's algorithm lists many others to try first. Many dogs need gabapentin or Lyrica, a CSF reducer like cimetidine or omaprazole, and sometimes an additional painkiller like tramadol). Once the pain situation has resolved then it is always possible to try to reduce back down and see if a lower dose can be used.

    As others have suggested, it is worth going to the neurologist to have the medications adjusted as vets are really dealing with a condition they generally do not understand and medications they do not know (gabapentin/Lyrica). This is very, very common to need adjustment, especially for newly treated dogs initially, and then again over time. Generally meds need to be increased and sometimes changed over time. Best of luck in finding the right mix of meds to help.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Leo Lily Tansy Libby (foster) Mindy (foster)
    In memory: Lucy
    Cavalier SM Infosite:www.smcavaliers.com

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    69
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks everyone

    We just ran out of Gabapentin yesterday. So we went back to Willows and got another box. This brings me back to the phone call my mom had with Stephanie, she said that we should start to lower it to 2 a day twice a day.... We thought we misheard this as surely.... Until after we got the second box of Gabapentin which was when we looked at his perscription paper which displayed 3 gabapentin 3 times a day for 30 days and then 2 for twice a day until the follow up, this isnt something we can just lower the dosage of surely?

    The other day, my Dad fed him his morning dose of gabapentin and he coughed it up onto the floor (as I discovered a white capsule later on which definitely was gabapentin because of the markings on it) right after my Dad left the room. As a result, he was sleeping all day in the same spot almost all day and could barely open his eyes (like a pain squinting) and his eyes were also much reder.

    So I cant imagine why we should lower the dosage? From what we experienced with the above we dont really feel all that comfortable with doing such a thing. I dont like doubting the neurologist as she obviously knows what shes doing, im just wondering why wed do that for? Is it to build up the dose in his body and then to bring it down to a permanent dose?
    Any ideas?
    Thank you all

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    797
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ZigsBro View Post
    Thanks everyone

    3 gabapentin 3 times a day for 30 days and then 2 for twice a day until the follow up, this isnt something we can just lower the dosage of surely?

    The other day, my Dad fed him his morning dose of gabapentin and he coughed it up onto the floor (as I discovered a white capsule later on which definitely was gabapentin because of the markings on it) right after my Dad left the room. As a result, he was sleeping all day in the same spot almost all day and could barely open his eyes (like a pain squinting) and his eyes were also much reder.

    So I cant imagine why we should lower the dosage? From what we experienced with the above we dont really feel all that comfortable with doing such a thing. I dont like doubting the neurologist as she obviously knows what shes doing, im just wondering why wed do that for? Is it to build up the dose in his body and then to bring it down to a permanent dose?
    Any ideas?
    Thank you all
    I don't know the answer to this one Bob, but I do think that you should speak to Stephanie on the 'phone to clarify what you should and should not be giving. I think you should also explain the present symptoms.

    It's easy to make sure capsules or tablets are swallowed - Just pop the capsule in the mouth, hold mouth shut, gently point muzzle upwards so that the throat is taut, then gently massage the throat muscle until the dog swallows what might be held there.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo & the ByFloSin Cavaliers
    Rebel, Winston Alexander,Little Joe & Holly Poppet
    Birmingham, UK

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Posts
    1,834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I get 15 pills a day down my Aled simply by wrapping them in Aldi's cheapest pate! Cheese or a scrap of ham or chicken roll also work well. I find the dosage you are giving a bit incomprehensible. Your neurologist seems to be treating gabapentin as a painkiller (give a high dose to zap the pain and then lower it), which it is not. It's a pain preventive, which prevents neurological pain rising to the surface, so to speak. (Rather as in hospices they treat pain by giving frequent, often quite small, doses of pain control such as morphine so that the patient is never stressed by becoming conscious of pain.) It is therefore vital that the dog is given blanket coverage, which for most dogs means 3 times a day (my Oliver is better on 4 times a day). The average time it takes for the drug to pass through the body is 8.5 hours - as this is an average, some will be able to go longer between pills, some (like Oliver) will go less. If by 3 gabapentin x 3 you mean 9 capsules a day, this is the maximum dosage. Most neurologists start with just 3 pills a day, 100mg x 3 times, and then gradually raise the dose if the pain isn't being adequately controlled (and perhaps add in a painkiller like Tramadol, and also prescribe a diuretic such as cimetadine (Zitac) to lower the cerebral spinal fluid). But very few dogs in pain will be able to go 12 hours between (lower) doses, which is what 2 twice a day means.

    You need to have a talk with Stephanie, explaining your concern that if a very high dose of gabapentin doesn't seem to be doing much, why is lowering the dose going to improve things. General experience with CM/SM seems to be that you need to tweak the medication for several weeks to find the right mix of drugs for your particular dog, and will need to do this from time to time in the future as it is a progressive disease.

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    69
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you both, It never occured to me to use pate! We always have some of Aldis pate (Good ol' Aldi!) in so thats another thing to try when we finally run out of sausage! (Sausage slices can be a little tricky to make sure the pill stays put)

    I completely agree, we'l be getting in touch with the Stephanie to find out some more information on the situation. Zigg has been improving ever so slightly over the past few days I think due to what I assume must be rising air pressure (I only started keeping track of it today) which is nice to see. I have noticed as a result of him seeming a little better that he has become slightly less fidgety which is very nice to see! I think once we finally get his meds evened out properly hel have more good days which will be nice.

    Some more info on the red eye, I have noticed that they are at their redest in the mornings and at night (it can be an hour or so after the dose of Gab) :


    Not sure why they are so red in the mornings and at night as during the daytime they are still red but not as much of a vibrant red as they would be in the mornings or at night. I have also noticed thats when his squinting gets worse. In that particular photo I dont think hes squinting in pain, he was blinking his eyes at the time (i think). Il show the pictures to Stephanie and hopefully we might be able to do something about that! Il keep you all posted

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •