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Thread: Sudden hearing loss

  1. #11
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    [QUOTE=RodRussell;436531]I think maybe you should get a second one. Deaf dogs get essential information from the non-deaf ones.

    So true -- my friend had one deaf dog and the second dog clearly served as his ears. They were always together, and the deaf dog took many cues from the non-deaf one. Not sure getting another dog is something you would want to consider, but it may be helpful.

  2. #12
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    Yes we've noticed that they can definitely become clingy when they lose their hearing, firstly with Rupert and then lately with Tommy, who seems to have gone almost totally deaf at the age of 5, very sad. He's terribly clingy at the moment, I can't move for him being under my feet I think it must be rather confusing and it takes a while for their other senses to compensate.

    Rupert developed the most incredible sense of smell, and as Karlin notes, he was always bright and responsive, and used to watch my face all the time. I carried on competing in obedience with him for a while.
    Nicki and the Cavalier Clan Our photos www.scotlandimagery.com
    Supporting www.rupertsfund.com and www.cavaliermatters.org

  3. #13
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    . . . perhaps a more practical response that they are going to have to rely more on humans to make up the deficiency caused by loss of hearing, and that they miss the contact provided by us talking to them
    That makes sense. Thanks for your input.

    UPDATE --- I took Sophie to the vet this afternoon, so that he could examine her. He checked her ears with the otoscope but did not see anything unusual. There was a trace amount of wax after digging (very gently) around in there with a long Q-Tip, but rather normal for any dog. He said there was a very small bit of wax in there, but given the heavy ragweed pollen right now (we're ALL suffering... dogs & people alike), thought it might be caused by that. He looked at it under the microscope and said there was also an extremely small amount of yeast. He knows about PSOM but did not see anything to indicate, and Sophie is exhibiting no symptoms other than hearing loss. He also knew that the breed is prone to deafness, but that it is noticeable at an earlier age than 5 years old.

    We were sent home with Otomax for her hears and a suggestion to give some Mucinex for several days, just to see if it makes any difference.... in case it is allergies. I know my own hearing is impaired by congestion from my allergies, so we're going to give it a try. He will call us in ten days to see if there is any improvement.

    All in all, I think it's just bad luck that it's happened to her at this age.

  4. #14
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    Nicki wrote 'I can't move for him being under my feet' - quite so... I was manoeuvring Aled in his buggy out of the sitting room door a couple of days ago, walking slowly backwards to get round dog baskets, settee etc and didn't realise Oliver was lying right across the doorway. I tripped over him and sprawled full length - fortunately away from him. I fall over quite often, due to a condition in my feet that upsets my balance, and I'm very aware that if I fell directly on Oliver I could kill him, or at least seriously damage his rather fragile spine (syrinx plus osteo-arthritis plus curvature of the spine). Missed him this time, fortunately, but had to shuffle around on my knees to find somewhere I could use to push myself upright! This too is a symptom of his deafness - as he can't hear what I'm doing, he lies in the doorway of whichever room I'm in (especially the kitchen) to see what's happening. Before his deafness he could hear food being dropped on the floor from the other end of my small bungalow; now he has to watch for it!

    Kate, Oliver and Aled

  5. #15
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    [QUOTE - as he can't hear what I'm doing, he lies in the doorway of whichever room I'm in (especially the kitchen) to see what's happening.][/QUOTE]

    Kate - that is so interesting to me, because I've noticed in the past month that Sophie positions herself right smack dab in the middle of my usual traffic pattern, no matter which room, but the worst is the kitchen! I'm no youngster, myself, and I worry that I'll trip over her and break some bones (either hers or mine!). This would explain her new positioning.

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