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Thread: What is breed Standard?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlin
    You need to ask Evelyn on what combinations would produce a B&T -- it depends on the parents and grandparents and which genes are dominant and recessive. I would presume she would know the full pedigrees of both these dogs and can tell you.
    Cavalier colors are pretty easy. Many breeds are much harder. Sandy

  2. #12
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    There's a link to a guide to colours in the Library. For detailed info, it makes sense for Fi to talk to Evelyn (who is head of the irish breed club and knows all the dogs involved and therefore, what colours any given crossing should produce).

    Here's the link: http://www.cavaliertalk.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=65
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

  3. #13
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    Back in the day when I thought it would be wonderful to show and breed...( that is untill I figured out that it would be a minimum of 35,000.00 start up to do it the right way for the first two years) I book marked this page. It may be of assistance to you

    http://cavalierkingcharles.info/colour_inheritance.html

    Hope it helps...
    A Good Attitude is like Kudzu~ It spreads quickly and never stops growing.......

  4. #14
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    Maxwell&ME: That is a GREAT link for color possibilities & basic genetic explanations! I've seen the link Karlin has provided (which is also wonderful), but being that I don't understand any French whatsoever, an Engligh site is great! THANKS!!


    Fi: If you are curious as to the "official" breed standard in the USA, this is directly from the CKCS Club, USA Website. The color standard is at the bottom. In my opinion, "mismarked" cavs are just as cute and wonderful as "show marked" cavs! Unless you are planning to show, it really doesn't matter!

    It is important to remember that a dog can have one or more of the faults listed in the Standard, in moderation, and still be an over-all typical gay, elegant Cavalier. On the other hand, bad temper or meanness are not to be tolerated and shall be considered disqualifying faults. It is the typical gay temperament, combined with true elegance and "royal" appearance, which are of paramount importance in the breed.


    [size=6]Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Breed Standard[/size]



    General: An active, graceful, well-balanced dog, very gay and free in action; Appearance: fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate.

    Head: The skull is lightly rounded, but without a dome or peak; it should appear flat because of the high placement of the ears.

    Eyes: Large, round and set well apart; color a warm, very dark brown, giving a lustrous, limpid look. There should be slight cushioning under the eyes, which contributes much to the sweet, gentle expression characteristic of the breed. Faults: Small, almond shaped, prominent, or light eyes; white surrounding ring.

    Nose: There should be a shallow stop, and the length from the base of the stop to tip of nose should be at least 1 1/2 inches. Nostrils should be well developed and the pigment uniformly black. Putty, or "dudley" noses, and white patches on the nose are serious faults, as are small, pinched nostrils.

    Muzzle: Well tapered; mouth level; lips well covering. Faults: Sharp, pointed or snipey muzzle. Full or pendulous lips. Flesh marks, i.e. patches of pink pigment showing through hair on muzzle.

    Teeth: Strong and even, preferably meeting in a scissor bite, although a level bite is permitted. Undershot mouths are greatly to be discouraged; it should be emphasized, however, that a slightly undershot bite in an otherwise well-balanced head with the correct sweet expression should not be penalized in favor of a level mouth with a plain or hard expression. Faults: Weak or crooked teeth; crooked jaws.

    Ears: Set high, but not close, on top of the head. Leather long, with plenty of silky feathering, and wide enough so that when the dog is alert, the ears fan slightly forward to frame the face.

    Neck: Fairly long, without throatiness, well enough muscled to form a slight arch at the crest. Set smoothly into nicely sloping shoulders.
    Shoulders: Sloping back gently with moderate angulation, to give the characteristic look of top class and presence

    Body: Short-coupled with ribs well sprung but not barrelled. Chest moderately deep, leaving ample heart room. Back level, leading into strong, muscular hind quarters. Slightly less ody at the flank than at the last rib, but with no tucked-up appearance

    Legs: Forelegs straight and well under the dog, bone moderate, elbows close to the sides. Hind legs moderately muscled; stifles well turned; hocks well let down. The hind legs viewed from the rear, should parallel each other from the hock to the heel. Pastern strong and feet compact with well cushioned pads. The dog stands level on all four feet. Faults: Loose elbow, crooked legs; stifles turned in or out; cow hocks; stiltedaction; weak pasterns; open feet.

    Tail: Set so as to be carried level with the back. Tail should be in constant, characteristic motion when dog is in action. Docking: Docking is optional, but whether or not the tail is docked, it must balance the body. If docked, the tail must not be cut too short; two-thirds is the absolute minimum to be left on the body, and the tails of broken-colored dogs should always be docked to leave a white tip.

    Coat: Long and silky and very soft to the touch; free from curl, though slight wave is permissible. Feathering on the ears, legs and tail should be long, and the feathering on the feet is a feature of the breed. Trimming: NO trimming of the dog is permitted. However, it is permissible, often desirable, to remove the hair growing between the pads and the underside of the foot.

    Size: Height 12 to 13 inches at the withers; weight, proportionate to height, between 13 and 18 pounds. These are ideal heights and weights; slight variations are permissible and a dog should not be penalized only in comparison with one of equal general appearance, type and quality. The weedy specimen is as much to be penalized as the oversized one.

    Colors: The following colors are the only ones acceptable:

    Blenheim: Rich chestnut markings well broken up on a pearly white ground. The ears must be red and the color evenly spaced on the head, with a wide white blaze between the ears, in the center of which is the much desired lozenge (diamond), or "Blenheim Spot". The lozenge is a unique and highly desirable, though not essential, characteristic of the Blenheim.

    Tricolor: Jet black markings broken up on a pearly white ground; with rich tan markings over the eyes, on the cheeks and on underside of tail.

    Ruby: Whole-colored rich red.

    Black-and-Tan: Jet black with rich tan markings over the eyes, on cheeks, inside ears, on chest, legs, and underside of tail.

  5. #15
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    Fi -

    I find it very disturbing that you have just bred your 2nd litter without even knowing the breed standard. IMHO - this is the absolute minimum knowledge that anyone involved in breeding any breed should be aware of. But more importantly are health issues. Especially in this breed where health problems are so common, getting animals screened for genetic diseases before breeding is essential and not doing so is irresponsible.

    Cavs are prone to eye problems so should have their eyes checked by an opthamologist before breeding - ideally annually.
    Cavs are very prone to heart problems and all breeding cavs should have their hearts checked by a board certified cardiologist - ideally every year. And ideally not breeding dogs until over 2 or 2.5 to avoid breeding a dog that will develop a murmur young. (I believe under 5 is considered young.) Also - you should check the parents and grandparents and as far back as possible to see what kind of hearts are in the lines.
    Cavs also are prone to hip dysplasia and should have their hips x-rayed and evaluated by OFA (or at least have the x-rays evaluated by your vet) to avoid passing on this debilitating genetic defect. OFA x-rays cannot be done until 2 years old. Also - it is a good idea to have patellas checked as this can also be a major problem and cost thousands of dollars to fix surgically.
    Not to mention Syringomyelia which is increasingly prevalent and overhwelmingly devastating. (I am trying to cope w/ this in my severely affected dog now.)

    Fi - if you really want to do this right - which it seems that you do - then you should start doing more research on Cavs and their health problems, breed standard, and responsible breeding. Ideally, research should be done BEFORE breeding, not afterwards. But you are where you are, and I encourage you to learn more about Cavaliers and their various devastating health problems before breeding again. At 3 months old, I'm not sure how you can have any idea of Lady should be bred. You need to wait years to see how she turns out, if she conforms to breed standard, and if she is healthy enough to be bred. It would be great if you could attend and participate in some shows also to see how she conforms to breed standard.

    There is lots of info in the health section of this board, actually. That would be a good place to start.
    Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.
    --Roger Caras

  6. #16
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    Here's a link to Karlin's FAQ on major health issues in the breed:

    http://www.cavaliertalk.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=26
    which includes additional links for more info.

    And the rest of the forum:
    http://www.cavaliertalk.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=11


    And here is breed standard:
    AKC: http://www.akc.org/breeds/cavalier_k...niel/index.cfm
    Irish Cavalier Club: http://homepage.eircom.net/~cavalier..._the_breed.htm
    Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.
    --Roger Caras

  7. #17
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    thank you for all the replies.....
    however my initial thoughts have been completly thrown by Rorys comments...... without seeming rude, i have done my research and i know full well the medical problems in Cav's, Also i am not one to sit back and say "oh i might not be able to breed of Lady" i look for the possitive and say i will, as i did with Max for a long time kept thinking he may be ok, but it came to a stage the decission was made that he was not suitable for shiring. If i didnt care about the breed of my dogs i would of bread off him regardless of the outcome.

    Max is too ill to be sterlised right now, but when he is given the all clear he will be done.

    alot of points i raise in this forum stem from talking to other members who raise an idea in my head for a topic that [i think] some other members may find interesting even if i know the answer, however i was not sure if it was ok to breed ruby with black and tan, of course i have done research but i wanted to hear it from real people i wanted to get feedback from people on this site to get a feeling if it was ok to do so. i know some people hate inter colour breeding...... and someone in the cavalier club here in Dublin actually is against cross breeding within cavaliers sets.

    I know Eveylin very well and have been to many shows and feed of her and others for information...... I listen to everything Evelyn tells me and if she advises something i do it, i will be going to her for a stud for Lady when she tells me it is ok to do so. she comes and sees my pups and tels me which ones she likes and why, she has been a tremendous support to me and im sure others.....

    I am not naive and i had to make this point .... that i do know what i am doing and i can assure you nothing i do is disturbing.
    thanks

    Fidelma
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    The average dog is often a nicer person than the average person. Andrew A. Rooney

  8. #18
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    Fi, with all due respect, Chloe should never have been bred without heart clearances. It truly worries me if the club is sanctioning breeding of dogs only a year old where nothing is known of their heart or other health history. This goes completely against what breed clubs advise worldwide and I don't really understand why the Irish one -- which sadly does not have a good international reputation on this issue, despite having an important role in the history of the breed-- isn't taking such health issues (literally) to heart. You cannot know enough about health issues if you haven't had hips certified and scored, cardiac testing done as a routine event, and it worries me that someone wasn't there with you in person, advising, through the whelpings you have done as clearly you have had so many questions -- and the answers should have come from a mentor sitting at your side, not someone who comes to visit the puppies many weeks later after the potentially traumatic and dangerous period of the whelping.

    I could not advise anyone taking puppies from a breeder who doesn't have any heart testing, as a basic precaution, done on their dogs. I would hope this will be done in future and that the breed club will take this on board as well -- they are already a decade out of tune on this very serious issue, from all I can see. I would hope more is happening behind the scenes than I am seeing up front but I am left a bit flummoxed that the head of a breed club seemingly is advising on matings where none of the dogs seem to have had the most basic testing done for the most serious medical condition facing the breed, when following the heart protocols is PROVEN to improve overall breed health and add years to the life of individual dogs. I would love to see these issues raised with the club and maybe some answers as to why they do not advocate these important health safeguards for this wonderful breed.
    Karlin
    Cavaliers: Jaspar Lily Tansy Libby Mindy
    In memory: Lucy Leo
    Cavalier SM Information site:www.smcavaliers.com

  9. #19
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    none of my dogs, including max have any heart defect, this has been checked.

    I have spoken to many breeders who were alone thier first time, and to recap "some" of the questions i have raised on the board are to raise an issue then to quelsh knowledge i need personally, if need informaiton i generally find in in many different sources to get a fair idea of what is true.

    Do you really think i want to breed a health problem into the breed??
    thanks

    Fidelma
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    The average dog is often a nicer person than the average person. Andrew A. Rooney

  10. #20
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    Karlin or Rory,

    Perhaps you can clear a question up for me....Its my understanding here in the States that a huge percentage of Cavalier have a heart problem...( My VET told me as many as 80 % develop some kind of Valve problem)

    But when I hear from people Like Fi...all their dogs are heart clear? Is there that much of a difference from Country to Country? It makes me think that the dogs in other places in the world have better hearts, or different tests being done that perhaps dont pick up the same things that the ones here do?

    ( sorry, havnt had a full cup of coffee this morning, hope you can understand what Im getting at)
    A Good Attitude is like Kudzu~ It spreads quickly and never stops growing.......

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